chocolate gene in large fowl in U.S.

elieugene6

Songster
9 Years
Jun 17, 2010
848
5
156
Western ny
Is the chocolate gene represented in any large fowl in the us that I don't have to spend $5000 to get? I have an idea for a project that I would like to do. This breed doesn't have many colors out there and I really love them. I would love to breed chocolate into them, not dun but chocolate. I don't think using a serama would work as this breed is just to large. Although with artificial insemination and a chocolate carrying male and lots of generations to get back up to size it may happen.
 

syble

Songster
9 Years
Jan 10, 2011
966
28
121
michigan
Quote:
Hardly! dun behaves like blue and gives you 3 possible different colored offspring... Chocolate behaves like black, if you breed chocolate to chocolate, you get chocolate. huge difference
wink.png

Sib
 

tgrlily

Songster
10 Years
Mar 11, 2009
1,140
5
161
East Syracuse
With the amount of breeding to get back up to size, you may be better off waiting for a LF chocolate. The bantam orp imports are supposed to be pretty big... somewhat closer to the size of American orps than to our bantams. Greenfire will have them in the fall for about $400 a pair. That wouldn't require as much breeding up for size as a serama.

Quote:
 

Chris09

Circle (M) Ranch
10 Years
Jun 1, 2009
10,999
596
328
Ohio
Quote:
Other than "looking" almost the same, there not even close to each other genitally.

Chocolate x Chocolate will breed true were as Dun x Dun will give you Dun Splash (25%), Dark Brown (Dun) (50%) and Black (25%)

Two doses (dun splash or khaki) breed true, so 100% dun splash or khaki.
Dun splash x black will give dark brown dun (100%).
Dun splash x dark brown dun gives dun splash (50%), dark brown dun (50%).
Dark brown dun x dark brown dun gives dun splash (25%), dark brown (50%) and black (25%).
Dark brown dun x black gives 50% dark brown dun and 50% black

The Chocolate gene is a sex linked recessive mutant gene, so the females cannot hide the gene. If they possess the choc gene, they will be Chocolate. Males, however can be carriers and require two copies to be visually Chocolate.

Chris
 

Henferno

Chirping
9 Years
Mar 27, 2010
155
1
99
Waushara County, WI
Quote:
Hardly! dun behaves like blue and gives you 3 possible different colored offspring... Chocolate behaves like black, if you breed chocolate to chocolate, you get chocolate. huge difference
wink.png

Sib

Chocolate behaves like self blue, not quite black. If you cross chocolate to black, theoretically, you get black birds split to chocolate, to my understanding.
big_smile.png
 

Illia

Crazy for Colors
10 Years
Oct 19, 2009
16,240
251
336
Forks, WA
Quote:
Hardly! dun behaves like blue and gives you 3 possible different colored offspring... Chocolate behaves like black, if you breed chocolate to chocolate, you get chocolate. huge difference
wink.png

Sib

Chocolate behaves like self blue, not quite black. If you cross chocolate to black, theoretically, you get black birds split to chocolate, to my understanding.
big_smile.png


The DUN type of "chocolate" behaves like blue. The true Chocolate, yes, behaves like a sex-linked "self-blue" (also known widely as Lavender)
 

Henk69

Crowing
Nov 29, 2008
1,777
115
251
Groesbeek Netherlands
Babysteps.

Just cross a chocolate serama rooster to a bantam as large as possible (mountable). They will be a lot bigger.
These you can cross with an even larger hen. Shouldn't take long.

Dun is superior to sexlinked chocolate:
Easier to breed.
More even distribution of pigment as far as I can tell. Dun is less prone to fleckiness as blue.
You get more colors. Khaki is NOT a splash like throw away color but beautiful itself.

Plus the combination of Dun and Chocolate is probably stunning!
So dun is not "not done"...
wink.png
 

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