Chocolate Hamantashen!?

rebbetzin

Songster
12 Years
Apr 4, 2008
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Today is Purim, the celebration of the happenings in the Book of Esther. One of the special treats for this holiday are Hamantashen, "Haman's Pockets" they are a filled cookie.

This year I made some of the dough chocolate, and put cherry and raspberry with mini chocolate chips in them. They were quite yummy!
Here they are, they taste better than the look.
Hamantashenemail.jpg
 
Last edited:

rancher hicks

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Feb 28, 2009
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They look delicious, but wasn't Haman the man who wanted to kill all the Jews, because Mordici wouldn't bow down to worship him? If so why would you want to make a cookie to honor him? And why "pockets"?
 

rebbetzin

Songster
12 Years
Apr 4, 2008
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Quote:
Yes, Haman is the bad guy!! May his name be blotted out!! If, King Saul, had obeyed the Holy One, and rid the land of ALL Amalakites, as he was commanded, we would not have this story. But, because, King Saul, allowed some of the offspring of King Agag to live, here centuries later, Haman is wanting to even the score because Saul/the Jews killed off most of his people.



And those are good questions, of which there are many answers depending on who you ask.

The cookies are known as Haman's Pockets, or Haman's Hats, Hanan's ears, or even Haman's donkey ears...

One story is they are his triagular-shaped pockets which held sliver coins to help fund the killing of the Jews.

Another story is he had a three cornered hat.

And yet another story goes like this, this is one I like...

The most well-known Purim treat is the triangular, filled pastry called hamantaschen, a Yiddish term meaning "Haman's pockets." It most probably a variation on the German treat called a "mohntaschen" (poppyseed pocket). It is a simple alliteration to go from "mohn" to "Haman." The first recorded mention of this treat is in a poem that dates to the 11th century. There is a tradition that the shape is reminiscent of the hats worn by the officers of the Persian court, including Haman. The pastry itself is filled with poppyseeds, prune, almond paste, or various jams. Another tradition has it that the filling, which is hidden in the traditional yeast dough, symbolizes God's hidden presence, in the Book of Esther.
 

PotterWatch

My Patronus is a Chicken
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Apr 22, 2008
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Those look great! I've never thought to use chocolate dough before but I bet it's great! Can you post the recipe you used?
 

rancher hicks

Crowing
11 Years
Feb 28, 2009
17,685
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Syracuse, NY
Quote:
Yes, Haman is the bad guy!! May his name be blotted out!! If, King Saul, had obeyed the Holy One, and rid the land of ALL Amalakites, as he was commanded, we would not have this story. But, because, King Saul, allowed some of the offspring of King Agag to live, here centuries later, Haman is wanting to even the score because Saul/the Jews killed off most of his people.



And those are good questions, of which there are many answers depending on who you ask.

The cookies are known as Haman's Pockets, or Haman's Hats, Hanan's ears, or even Haman's donkey ears...

One story is they are his triagular-shaped pockets which held sliver coins to help fund the killing of the Jews.

Another story is he had a three cornered hat.

And yet another story goes like this, this is one I like...

The most well-known Purim treat is the triangular, filled pastry called hamantaschen, a Yiddish term meaning "Haman's pockets." It most probably a variation on the German treat called a "mohntaschen" (poppyseed pocket). It is a simple alliteration to go from "mohn" to "Haman." The first recorded mention of this treat is in a poem that dates to the 11th century. There is a tradition that the shape is reminiscent of the hats worn by the officers of the Persian court, including Haman. The pastry itself is filled with poppyseeds, prune, almond paste, or various jams. Another tradition has it that the filling, which is hidden in the traditional yeast dough, symbolizes God's hidden presence, in the Book of Esther.

That is absolutely nice of you to answer my questions. And very interesting. Do you have a copy of the poem or know where I can find it? Also I would love the recipe for my wife. I notice you said "here", are you in Isreal? Would to God I should be blessed to visit again.
 

jeaucamom

Songster
12 Years
Oct 1, 2007
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Ophir, CA
LOL those don't look anything like my first attempt this year at hamenstashen.... Definitely lost the whole shortbread cookie taste and wound up with something aking to glue tasting LOL... well better luck next year....

What else did you do to celebrate Purim? I had several ideas, but got called in to work at the last minute. It was very dissappointing. Hope you had a great one. Chag Sameach!
 

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