chronic resperatory disease?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by sunket77, Mar 11, 2012.

  1. sunket77

    sunket77 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Hi everyone (fist I want to say I would post in the emergency and diseases section BUT I have never gotten many or any responses on there the several times I have tried....I would be lucky to get one)

    I have a 3 year old Lakenvelder hen who one day I noticed had a snotty nose, I picked her up and noticed she has a bad smell coming from her as well. I had a friend come out to check my flock and help me figure out what to do. He has a lot of experience with poultry. He came two days later and her nose was a little wet but not like it was, she was acting fine. The whole run was smelly due to constant days of rain so after checking over the other birds and watching her he said she seemed fine. None of the other birds in the flock have any symptoms. We had dismissed the whole thing and everyone has been fine, passed it of to the muddy conditions maybe clogging her nose.
    It has been about two months and we decided to enter her in the chicken show. So I had the kids bring her in and bathe her and get her ready and she seemed to be fine. BUT when I got her to the show, her nose was clogged and I smelled the odor again. I didn't put her in the show and brought her home. I am not sure what it could be, it doesn't seem to be affecting anyone else at all. No sneezing or head shaking just snotty nose and bad smell. She is even laying.
    I just don't know what to do with her. Things have gotten tough since I am the main chicken care taker and now that I am 4 mo. pregnant I have a sever joint issue and not able to really get out and do what I normally do. My husband and kids have been doing most of it and only know mostly the basics in chicken care. I need a quick way to take care of her so she can go back with the flock, if I had the heart I would just cull her but she is one of our first and the kids love her. Any ideas???
     
  2. ChickensAreSweet

    ChickensAreSweet Heavenly Grains for Hens

    Infectious Coryza Incubation Period hours to days Course time is days 3 months
    An acute to chronic infectious respiratory disease of chickens, pheasants and guineas caused by a bacterium. Chickens 14 weeks of age and older are most susceptible and it increases with age. Characterized by conjunctivitis;, catarrhal inflammation of the mucous membrane of the upper respiratory tract (nostrils, sinuses, and upper windpipe); sneezing, swelling of the face and reduced egg production in hens. Transmission is bird to bird within a flock. Recovered birds remain carriers. Within an outbreak flock, contaminated feed and or water is probably the mode of spread. Birds risk exposure at poultry shows, bird swaps and live bird sales. Clinical signs are swelling and puffiness around the face and wattles, thick stick discharge from the nostril (and a very offensive odor!) , labored breathing, and rales are the common clinical signs. There is a drop off in in feed and water consumption as well as egg production. The birds may have diarrhea and growing birds become stunted. Illness persists for several weeks, continuously if complicated with mycoplasma gallisepticum. Treatment is usually sulfadimethoxine (Albon). If Albon fails or is not available, sulfamethazine, sulfamerazine or erythroymcin (Gallimycin) can be used as alternate treatments. If you have an outbreak, segregate birds by age and dispose of dead bird by incineration. All replacement birds on a "coryza endemic" farm should be vaccinated.

    from:
    http://www.amerpoultryassn.com/respiratory_disease.htm

    You might consider that it could be coryza if there is a bad smell. I don't know what the diagnosis of your chicken is, but I have read about the smell associated with it.
     
  3. donrae

    donrae Hopelessly Addicted Premium Member

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    Please note with this, "recovered birds remain carriers". Please close your flock, do not take any birds off your property and practice biosecurity! Sorry I can't help with treatment, I cull sick birds.
     
  4. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble

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    Agreed. If the foul odor was about the head area, most likely coryza. Treatment is sulmet in conjunction with an antibiotic such as tylan or baytril. Good luck.
     
  5. sunket77

    sunket77 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    she doesn't have any of the other symptoms [​IMG] only the snotty nose and smell and this morning back to normal no snotty nose. This is very confusing to me, she has and has had clear eyes, no swelling and normal poop. I still laying and eating and drinking like normal.
     
  6. sunket77

    sunket77 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    is there a way to test for this? I would be willing to take her to the vet for confirmation to know so I don't spread it. It would be pretty devistating to our kids to have a closed flock because they show chickens and work hard taking care of them.
     
  7. ChickensAreSweet

    ChickensAreSweet Heavenly Grains for Hens

    http://www.merckvetmanual.com/mvm/index.jsp?cfile=htm/bc/206600.htm

    This link has some information but I am sorry I have not dealt with this...best bet is to call your vet to see- or the extension agent.
     
  8. D Ray

    D Ray New Egg

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    sunket77


    What you ever find out? Was there a test? Is the fowl smell the key to tell it was coryza?

    Thanks
     

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