Citron_d'uccle's guide to incubating hatching eggs.

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by Citron_d'uccle, Sep 27, 2011.

  1. Citron_d'uccle

    Citron_d'uccle Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 15, 2011
    Fort Worth, TX
    With this thread I hope to give some advice to newbies who are setting their first batch of hatching eggs, are considering incubating, or who might have questions that pertain to incubating.

    1.) BE PATIENT. I cannot stress this enough. SoOoO many times I hear of newcomers who 'sabotage' what would have otherwise a very prospective hatch due to a simple lack of patience. This applies to all aspects of the hatch. This includes breed selection, BREEDER SELECTION, incubator selection, as well as patience during hatch time. Always use patience as your first instinct during hatch time.

    2.) Research about incubating a lot before you make a decision to go out and buy an incubator and buy an incubator to start hatching. I usually recommend that beginners go to a small farm, or a friend that raises chickens. Any breeder worth thier salt will have a 'broody hen'. I try to find a breeder who allows thier 'broody hen' to occasionally hatch out a batch of chicks. If you are fortunate enough to get to see a 'broody hen' set from about day 18-23 of a hatch you can learn a TON about how a real, live incubation occers. Most 'broody hens' are very protective of the hatch and will rarely leave her nest, and when she does it is for a very brief period. This goes back to rule #1.

    3.) I suggest NOT buying hatching eggs off ebay, CL, etc. Unless that is you know that the breeder is reputable. If the breeder is on ebay as well as BYC then I could see where that might be advantageous. I suggest trying to find a breeder on BYC, or on the breed's particular club website.

    4.) Be prepared to dish out some $$$. The reason I say this is because you should buy a good incubator. A decent 'bator will run anywhere from $150-250, and can cost $600-$1200 for a professional model. An excellent dozen hatching eggs can cost up to $60 (although I have seen very good looking eggs on BYC for $12 [​IMG] ). Various other costs should be factored as well.

    5.) Once hatching begins, try not to open the 'bator until day 22.5 unless you absolutely must.

    6.) Refer to rule 1.


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