Comb halfway ripped off hens head

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by asthrngal89, Dec 5, 2015.

  1. asthrngal89

    asthrngal89 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Dec 12, 2014
    Kelly, NC
    I was watering my father's chickens when I noticed one of his hens comb flipped over it seemed to be halfway torn its still bright read no part of it looks dead its scabbed very well but I put neosporin on it . she doesn't act sick or like anything is even wrong. Is this okay or should I just let it heal on its own? It doesn't seem to be infected. I'm thinking she must have stuck her head through the fence ...they do this when someone comes outside just because we give them dinner scraps often and veggies. It must have gotten caught and ripped backwards that's what it seems like! I was worried I should keep an eye on her comb if it looks like part of it starts to die could I tie a string around it tightly to make the torn part fall off? Any hell is appreciated!
     
  2. asthrngal89

    asthrngal89 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Dec 12, 2014
    Kelly, NC
    Help***
     
  3. rIrs roost

    rIrs roost Sir Crows A lot Premium Member

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    I'm posting to see if someone with more experience can help you. Don't panic. I'm pretty sure she'll be fine. I recently had a dog almost rip my hens tail off and messed her wing and back up. You may want to separate her from the others so they don't peck at it.
     
  4. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive True BYC Addict

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    I would tend to leave it alone to heal if it doesn't become a problem. As long as it is red and the blood supply is good it may heal. Neosporin is fine, or you can use some Vetericyn or BluKote. If the other chickens leave her alone, then she may not need to be separated. If you do feel that it needs to be docked, then get some betadine or alcohol to disinfect the skin, blood stop powder or flour to stop any bleeding, and use a very sharp pair of scissors. Use pressure on the cut with a cotton cloth or towel for 5 minutes afterward to help the blood to clot.
     
    Last edited: Dec 5, 2015

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