Comparing radiant heaters inside of coop. Sweeter Heater inside of coop or radiant wall heaters? A

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by DocumentedPure, Apr 12, 2017.

  1. DocumentedPure

    DocumentedPure Out Of The Brooder

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    Okay, I get it. Many people do not use heat inside of their coops. That is fine and dandy. I also know that chickens can produce approximately 5 btu of heat themselves every hour. I will put Vaseline on their combs to prevent frostbite. I also plan on using the deep litter method, and providing cracked corn in the winter which will help keep their temperatures up. I will be keeping this by the roost, however above the ground high enough from the substrate. I will be consulting an electrician about wiring it, and using breakers to cut the power if there are problems. There will be fire alarms, and fire and bite proof wires. So please, do not say anything in the comments about the things I have already stated. You will just be tooting your own horn and wasting my time. Thanks in advance. Please do not provide alternative heating methods. I have looked into all of them. These are the ones I am selecting from, so lets please try to stay on topic.

    So, on to the real subject. I am considering using one of these three radiant heating elements to heat my coop. I will be using a thermocube 35-45 F which will tell the heating element to turn off and on. If you have experience in using other temperature heat cubes, I would be interested in hearing about that. Or, other ways that you set automatic temperature control switches.

    So, here is the real dillema. I am stuck about which of these products would work best. Does anyone have personal experience with any of these products? The place I live dips down to subzero temperatures a couple times per year, and I want to keep my chickens laying, and the eggs from not freezing as fast before I have time to get out there and grab them. I would rather have my hens and roosters focused on making babies instead of just struggling to stay warm. I am planning on installing this inside of an 8x4 well ventilated walk in coop. So, here are the options.

    https://www.amazon.com/Cozy-Products-CL-Radiant-Heater/dp/B00FRFFC4W/ref=pd_sbs_86_5?_encoding=UTF8&pd_rd_i=B00FRFFC4W&pd_rd_r=EPRD7SQJYF5TNBT25KQR&pd_rd_w=us4eF&pd_rd_wg=s4JeO&psc=1&refRID=EPRD7SQJYF5TNBT25KQR
    Only 150 watt heater. Many people are happy with this product using it in their coops according to amazon. It is recommended by the Chicken Chick.


    https://www.amazon.com/Cozy-Products-Chicken-Heater-Technology/dp/B01LX9K1JI/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1491987136&sr=8-1&keywords=coop+heater
    200 watt designed for chickens $42

    Look into sweeter heater for heating the coops. It says that it is energy efficient. This product is pretty good, and it comes in a size that is 11x40 yet only takes up 150 watts of electricity. The price for that one is $140. I like this one because of the space it covers. I am not sure whether or not I should mount it on the side, or let it hang from chains. I like the idea of letting it hang by chains, because I could better utilize how many chickens have access to it, by being on top, below, and on the sides of it. I would put a layer of something directly above it if the heat can rise above 100 F, which I am pretty sure will not happen in 20 F weather. However I do like the idea of a side wall mount because it would mean that I do not have as many chickens jumping on top of other chickens, or
    http://sweeterheater.com/

    https://www.mypetchicken.com/catalo...Lt9ub29UB-z6BKHNhYjyko5L8OtnCN2XquRoC_xbw_wcB
    Here is more info on the sweeter heater.

    https://www.omegafields.com/blog/getting-started-right/
    And more info on the sweeter heater.

    Does anyone have any advice about how long these products last over time? How about fluctuations in output? Has anybody experienced issues with any of these devices? I am most concerned about the Sweeter Heater because I can hardly find any reviews or relevant information about it. Does anyone know about how these products compare in the heat output they generate?

    Thank you for your time and for your wisdom!
     
  2. Howard E

    Howard E Chillin' With My Peeps

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    What USDA plant zone are you in and what are your long term, lowest temps and average low temps in winter?
     
  3. DocumentedPure

    DocumentedPure Out Of The Brooder

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    Thank you Howard, those are excellent questions, and I would have never thought to check the USDA for this type of climate information. The area I live in is classified as 6B, which is average annual temperature extremes of -5 to 0 F. According to a separate temperature report, the average extreme temperature reports are as followed for the winter months, Dec. 1 F to 56, Jan 0 F to 51, and Feb 1 F to 54. According to that second site, the average temperatures for those months are Dec., 28 F, Jan., 28 F, and Feb., 32 F.
     
  4. IdyllwildAcres

    IdyllwildAcres Chillin' With My Peeps

    So why are you heating the coop exactly?

    Not tooting horns or wasting time, just curious.

    Gary
     
  5. Howard E

    Howard E Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I'll leave it you you to make your own choice, but since you asked for advice on heaters, here it is. You don't need one. In fact, until a grower is facing temps consistently below -20F or so, a heater is not needed and may run counter to what is intended. Provided you use the right appliance, the fire hazard may be overblown, but if the birds never acclimate to the cold, in the event of a power failure, they may all perish unless you also provide for a supplemental power source like your own generator.

    As you have discovered, birds generate a considerable amount of radiant heat themselves. Combined with the insulating qualities of their feathers, a bunch of birds huddled together do remarkably well in an unheated house. They do even better if the house is insulated, still with no heat.

    What is needed for their comfort and safety is a dry, well lighted, draft free roost space. Dry is a tough concept to grasp. The natural tendency is to want to close up the coop to keep in any heat. It may do that, but a tight, closed up coop also retains all the moisture that is generated by the birds themselves. It comes from their breath and it comes from their droppings and there is a lot of it. Unless that moisture is vented to the outside, it starts to accumulate inside and then condenses on any internal surface, including the birds. Places like their combs, and that is what leads to frostbite.

    So dry is warm and well ventilated is dry. The trick beyond that is to provide enough ventilation, yet not have a lot of moving air......drafts.......at the roost level.

    Again, feel free to do as you wish, but you will save yourself a lot of worry and trouble if as you design and build your coop, you do so with plans to not include a supplemental heat source.
     
    1 person likes this.
  6. IdyllwildAcres

    IdyllwildAcres Chillin' With My Peeps

    Yup, my thoughts exactly. I can see it now, its 12 degrees and the power goes out. Birds are not hardened off to the cold and they die. I wouldnt do it. I am brooding 7 10 day olds with a heat plate in the coop, lowest temp so far this week about 30. It will warm up over the next month and I am guessing they will not need heat by week 4 or 5 then after that they will never need it. I live in the mountains about 5300' above sea level and we will see temps in the teens over the winter. My coop (link below) is well vented, one entire wall is pretty much open and there are 3 windows and upper vents. No insulation and no plans for heat. Good luck

    Gary
     
  7. DocumentedPure

    DocumentedPure Out Of The Brooder

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    You know what guys? I think I am going to take your word for it. The things you say do add up. I have considered adding a local generator, and adding a wifi adapter to the lines of electricity to notify me if the power does go out. However, there is a good chance I do not make it there in time. All of this is exceptionally expensive and labor intensive, especially since they are a living and breathing flock of heaters. I am especially concerned about the possibility of losing my entire flock if the power goes out and they are not adapted well to handling the sudden drop of temperature. That would be worst case scenario, and probable if I artificially control the temperature of their environment. Thank you for your input.

    I do however, have a follow up question. I am considering adding four double paned insulated windows backed by hardware cloth covered vents to my enclosure. Two of them that are high, and two that are lower. I am not sure what size to make them in my 8 by 4 foot enclosure. The reason behind it is to open the higher two in the summer to release heat, and then to close those off in the winter time, and lowering the bottom two so that the risen heat will flow up and heat the enclosure naturally, while still allowing humidity and dust to flow from the lower vents. Do you guys think this would be a good idea? I plan to have clear corrugated roof covering my enclosure, along with 3 feet of clear corrugated plastic going up the bottom side of my 6 foot enclosure, to keep moisture out, but to allow light inside. I want to add a roof on the actual coop itself made of smoke colored semi clear plastic corrugated roof on the enclosure, with foam insulation filling the gaps on my enclosure. I also want to install mylar on the walls, covered in white linoleum on the bottom half, so that it still reflects light, but does not cause them to stress out from seeing their reflections, yet allowing the mylar to be exposed on the upper half, to provide excellent reflection of light while still providing great insulation from the elements. The entrance will always be open to provide them freedom to move around, and ventilation. Yet the coop will be entirely covered with 1/2 inch hardware cloth to keep predators out.

    Do you feel that this will be adequate well ventilation, yet well insulation, yet providing excellent light transmission?
     
    Last edited: Apr 12, 2017
  8. IdyllwildAcres

    IdyllwildAcres Chillin' With My Peeps

    I would likely never close the two high ones as long as there is no draft on the birds roosting, that way the moist air in winter has a way out. I have dual pane windows on my coop, only because I had them on hand if I were buying new I would not pay up for them. I spent a ton of money on my coop, but its wide open for the most part. Maybe consider just having hardware cloth vents on the top year round, save the money on windows...

    Good luck and I am looking forward to coop pics!

    Gary
     
    Last edited: Apr 12, 2017
  9. Hokum Coco

    Hokum Coco Overrun With Chickens

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    Quote:
     
    Last edited: Apr 12, 2017

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