Confused About Keeping Roo

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by chica57, Aug 2, 2010.

  1. chica57

    chica57 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 25, 2009
    About 2weeks ago wrote into the forum wondering why my new girls wouldnt leave the coop-ok thought would take about 2wks for them to feel safe to come out and not be harmed by the older girls-well......I was a little suspicious about one of the new girls (Buff Brahma) maybe being a rooster-my instincts turned out right-took Rebecca er.. Rambo to the 4-H fair to be positive-yep Rambo-He's Beautiful but has been the one keeping the new girls from coming out into the run found out to protect them from the older girls-been watching closely and he does really guard the door now-yesterday he ventured out a little but ran when the older girls noticed him-NOW THE QUESTION-I only wanted the girls for eggs and I just love having them-really didnt want a rooster (nothing against them) I did read the brahmas are a more gentle rooster-not worried about the crowing I live on alot of land. Someone told me I should try it and keep him just really confused keep him or get rid of him before I get to attached (Well I already am) more work than I would think?? Dont want chicks and never had a rooster. All input is greatly appreciated!!!!!!!! [​IMG]
     
  2. tobin123

    tobin123 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 4, 2009
    fountaintown,indiana
    Dont need a rooster if you don't want chicks.A rooster is good for the pecking order and to watch over the hens.It is really up to you
     
  3. Tala

    Tala Flock Mistress

    I wouldn't free range without a rooster, but that's just me.
    If you aren't afraid of him, not bothered by crowing, and aren't afraid of eating fertilized eggs, what's the problem? Just keep him. In my experience, roosters have so much more personality (or maybe I just have really dull hens?)
    You don't have to incubate the eggs, and you can take them away IF a hen goes broody. Having a rooster does not automatically = chicks.
     
  4. chica57

    chica57 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 25, 2009
    Forgot to mentio-I dont free range my chickens-they have a huge run-does a rooster NEED to free range and will he also take over my other girls that are now 1 1/2 yr old?? Right now like I mentioned he runs from them.
     
  5. gryeyes

    gryeyes Covered in Pet Hair & Feathers

    Roosters don't "need" to range freely; they can live in a large run just as well as pullets & hens.

    Just gather the eggs daily, as usual, because it doesn't matter if the eggs are fertilized or not - the fertilized eggs will not hatch unless they are incubated. Embryos will not develop without incubation, artificial (incubator) or natural (under a broody hen).

    I just love having a rooster. He stops squabbles between hens, in addition to a slew of other positive attributes.
     
  6. spammy

    spammy Out Of The Brooder

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    Aug 17, 2009
    When I sit on the porch and watch chicken TV the rooster is always the star.
     
  7. le neige homme

    le neige homme Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sometimes, it breaks my heart that people are such rooster haters. It's actually quite selfish/greedy, IMHO, to refuse to keep one when you're allowed.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 3, 2010
  8. bigstack

    bigstack Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jan 4, 2010
    Texarkana, TX
    As your roo matures he should take the lead in the flock. I have seen a few that were happy just to stay in the flock and be second to an old hen! LOL Roo's can provide some protection from some predators! Personally I would just keep him. You never know. You may change your mind. you may not. But they are much more fun( to me) than all hens. Once he starts to do his dance, sing his cooing (love) songs, and talking to the girls, its great to see! Even in a large coop he can watch for owl's, hawks, and other birds of prey, while the girls much!

    No, No animal (including human) NEEDS to free range! As long as you have propper nutrition and exercise! Is it better? YES. Is it healthier? YES. are they happier? YES. are they more productive? I think so. Personally I always ask myself," if it was me, what would I want/feel/need....etc?"

    On another note: I think the girls will feel better knowing there is a roo there to protect them! It is their natural flock design. this is probly not much help but if you can, you don't mind, and he is a good roo; I would say keep him and let nature do it's thing.

    Good Luck and God Bless!

    P.s. My bird's don't free range. Too much wild life here! But they have a HUGE run and I am planning on adding 3 more runs the same size so I can move them from 1 to the other for the grass. All 4 will be attached to the coop. 1 on each side.
     
    Last edited: Aug 3, 2010
  9. Southernbelle

    Southernbelle Gone Broody

    Mar 17, 2008
    Virginia
    I keep my chickens penned and I love having a rooster. They protect the girls and if a predator got in, he would sacrifice himself to save the girls. They also keep the peace in the flock and will break up fights between the hens. A good rooster is worth his weight in gold!
     
  10. sixinva

    sixinva Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:Are we equating chickens to children? Same children that could be in danger from an aggressive Roo??? I too am on the fence a bit on this matter,,,,,,

    Ive had my small flock for about 18 weeks now...5 hens and one roo....and while the rooster does get a bit agressive, and sometimes stands his ground, he has not attacked me yet....he only gets one chance..he does hop on those hens all the time, and if i start to have bare backed hens, as I dont want chicks, then out he goes as well. So I guess for me it boils down to if he behaves, acts decently and not too rough, then he can stay, otherwise, I know a few farms that will take him....
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 3, 2010

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