conure gender

Discussion in 'Caged Birds - Finches, Canaries, Cockatiels, Parro' started by E-AK(TM), Jun 22, 2011.

  1. E-AK(TM)

    E-AK(TM) Out Of The Brooder

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    Are there any ways to make a very good guess about a conures gender without dna testing? any suggestions?
     
  2. Stacykins

    Stacykins Overrun With Chickens

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    The only way to tell a conure's sex (not gender, gender is what human belief (a male who feels female, for instance, but is physically male), not a physical trait like possessing male sex organs) is if a female lays an egg, or DNA sexing. There is no other way. DNA sexing isn't that expensive nowadays, anyway. My eight year old sun conure (sexed female when she was a hatchling) laid an egg when she was seven. Some females may do so sooner, or never.
     
  3. 9Catsz

    9Catsz Chillin' With My Peeps

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    You can also get your bird surgically sexed by a vet. I've had all my nondimorphic birds DNA sexed via a blood sample through Avianbiotech.com
    They were 100% correct on every sample I sent, BTW.
     
    Last edited: Sep 3, 2011
  4. Crimsonchicken

    Crimsonchicken Out Of The Brooder

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    How do I say this politely...sometimes you can tell a birds sex by how they *erhrm* please themselves. I have a green cheek conure who i am 99.9% positive is a male due to his behavior. When birds mate, males kind of wrap their tails and bottoms around the females tail. When Verde, my conure, attempts to mate with non bird objects (toys, his fuzzy, my hand._.) he assumes this position. He really enjoys doing this and when it's my hand being *erhrm* molested, I always make him stop and put him in his cage because I don't want him thinking I'm his mate [​IMG]. I've heard that females will back up against their chosen "mate" with their tail kinda raised. Sorry if this post weirded anybody out. I just thought this info might be helpful and of interest.[​IMG]

    I would also like to add that I also have a Patagonian conure who is as old as the green cheek and has never exhibited any type of mating behavior. So this information is only helpful if you have a "naughty" bird [​IMG].
     
    Last edited: Sep 3, 2011
  5. 9Catsz

    9Catsz Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Yes, Crimsonchicken, that's true in some cases, but not all. I've got a female peachfaced lovebird who does that very same thing that your male does but she does it on a perch and I've got a male lovebird who, when I pet his back, spreads his wings out and raises his rump just like a female does in preparation for the male to mount her. I know the sex of these birds, they're proven breeders. If you want to breed nondimorphic bird species, then DNA sexing is well worth the bucks to know what sex your bird is. Saves a lot of time in observing them hoping they'll do some behavior that will indicate their sex....and then it could still be wrong.
     
    Last edited: Sep 3, 2011
  6. Crimsonchicken

    Crimsonchicken Out Of The Brooder

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    Birds are so weird [​IMG] I have just assumed Verde is a male, but your post makes me wonder. I have no desire to ever breed conures so it is not that imperative that I know my birds sex. But, I guess DNA testing is the best route if you are.
     
    Last edited: Sep 3, 2011
  7. Moonkit

    Moonkit Chillin' With My Peeps

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    A way that a conure breeder that I bought one of my babies from showed me to sex them is to feel their pelvic bone. It works best with birds over 6 months old. With females, their will be enough space for the tip of your pinkie to rest in.. the males will be pressed together in a point. She explained that its because the females need to have the room to pass the eggs through... males, obviously, don't need the room for that.

    Now, I did have my female DNA tested.. and from 'monitoring' the one we bought that the breeder suggested might be male (he was only 3 months at the time), I've noticed that as he approaches a year old, his pelvis bone is much narrower than Passion's (my female).
     
  8. 9Catsz

    9Catsz Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:Pelvic bone sexing is not 100%. It works best after the females have laid eggs....not before. On the lovebird thread I posted a pic of one of my lovies...Olivia.....Sexed via pelvic bones at around 8 months of age and named Olivia because I thought it was a female.......In reality, Olivia is a male.

    I've had about a 100 birds DNA sexed via blood and they were 100% correct on every one of them. If you're wanting to breed birds, you can't go wrong with DNA sexing.
     
  9. AquaEyes

    AquaEyes Chillin' With My Peeps

    Why is there such resistance to DNA testing? It's not expensive, typically in the neighborhood of $20-$30.

    [​IMG]
     
  10. 9Catsz

    9Catsz Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:I'm only guessing here but if people don't intend to breed their animals then they don't want to spend the dollars for DNA sexing. Someone who can't do it themselves would have to go to a vet and not just any vet will see birds so there would be a vet charge too.
    or
    Perhaps they're afraid of the unknown...they don't know how to obtain the blood for the DNA or they're afraid to hurt their birds, etc.


    I swear by it![​IMG]
     

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