Convert Loafing Shed To Coop - New To Everything Here - HELP!!

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by Rollochrome, Sep 10, 2013.

  1. Rollochrome

    Rollochrome New Egg

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    Aug 22, 2013
    Here are interior pics of a two horse loafing shed that I got along with the property I just bought.

    Pics start with the left of the room, then middle, then the right side where there is a saddle lockup.

    What is not very visible is the corral on the other side thru the opening you can see sunlight thru. You've got a covered "porch" outside there and then an open corral with cattle panels on all sides.

    What do you think? Does this make for a good coop conversion structure?

    I have NEVER owned chickens....so the following is my BEST shot at looking at this. PLEASE feel free to poke holes in any of this reasoning:

    THE GOOD:
    1. The place where I am standing is accessible by a sliding barn door. It is concrete, and I am figuring on accessing nest boxes from this side for egg retrieval. I can string chicken wire along the entire pipe "wall" here so that chickens are kept from walking this area.
    2. The concrete area would be good for scratch storage, and running incubators. I can also place a big heater in there if necessary and nothing would get close to it for fire hazard.
    3. I can chicken wire the outside corral and deer net the top?? Is that the right way to look at that?
    4. I can open the gate on the corral every morning and let the chickens out all day to free range.
    5. Horse waterers on either side good for chickens too??
    6. Floor is wood chips. Probably cedar? Already a good surface for deep composting.

    THE BAD:
    1. The open sunshine you see is just that....open. No way of totally closing in the room. I suppose with the entire outside area chicken wired and deer netted, there is less of a chance that the perimeter would be breached by an animal, but I would have to run plastic over it in the winter I guess if chickens are not cold tolerant.



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    Let me know your thoughts.....tips.....pointers......suggestions....

    Unless I know anything better....I was thinking I would build nest boxes on that pipewall you see with a door on the back for egg retrieval. Then just run wood branches all everywhere in there for perches. Then chicken wire everything and deer net the open top of the corral and call it a day??
     
  2. OldGuy43

    OldGuy43 Chillin' With My Peeps

  3. Rollochrome

    Rollochrome New Egg

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    Aug 22, 2013
    North Texas..

    Not exactly Alaskan winters
     
  4. OldGuy43

    OldGuy43 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Yessir! When we started raising chickens about 3 years ago I was worried about cold weather until I found that thread. [​IMG]
     
  5. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler! Premium Member

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    My Coop
    WOW what a great structure to start with!!

    Lots to think about, I would suggest doing some reading here on coops, feeding/watering and predator protection before buying any chickens.

    Open is good for Texas, especially with a metal building....you may have to block any cold raging winds in the winter.

    Consider that chicken wire will keep chickens in but not keep predators out.

    Attaching whatever wire you choose to the metal everything may take some creativity.
     
  6. zengrrl

    zengrrl Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I'm so jealous! I want a horse and look at the set up you have. Well I think you can pull it off. You should see the monstrous beast I had to start with (think its in my pics) and as long as you can make it predator safe you'll be fine.
     
  7. Rollochrome

    Rollochrome New Egg

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    Aug 22, 2013
    Whats the best wire then?
     
  8. WYNot

    WYNot Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Hardware cloth. The stuff that has 1/2"x1/2" grid rather than the standard chicken wire that has six-sided openings. The chicken wire still allows smaller predators like raccoons and opossums to reach through and get ahold of your chickens. and it isn't as sturdy against the bigger stuff.
     

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