Coop door that is predator proof

Discussion in 'Predators and Pests' started by izziebean, Oct 11, 2015.

  1. izziebean

    izziebean Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Hi! I keep seeing coop doors that slide up and down with the pull of a string.. some of them have an automatic timer to pull the door up when the sun comes up. I was thinking about putting one of these on one side of the coop. It would be inside the run which will be covered with hardware cloth.. top, bottom, and sides. I'm worried though if a racoon slipped inside somehow, would he/she be able to pull the door open? I know they are smart with locks. Can they open a small door that gets pulled up?
     
  2. MeepBeep

    MeepBeep Chillin' With My Peeps

    When it comes to raccoons you can assume if a 5 year old child could figure it out and do it so can a raccoon...

    As for your question of "if a racoon slipped inside somehow, would he/she be able to pull the door open?" I'm confused here, if they are already inside why are you concerned they might be able to get out? Chances are if they are inside the coop it's too late for the chickens already, it won't matter if he find a way to open them door and let himself out after the fact...
     
  3. izziebean

    izziebean Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sorry.. that part was confusing. The mottled houdan hens love to jump the chicken wire fence to roam free while my polish roo chases them around the yard. They dust bathe in the garden and pick worms out of the yard. The silkies and frizzles seem content to stay in the fenced in area. I guess you are right.. if the coon has already gotten in the run.. then the damage will be done.

    I was thinking more about if I am out and about and my chickens had gotten used to putting themselves up at night. They would be in the coop. The door would be shut by the automatic door closer, but the run door would be open until I got home for the evening. BUT! I think the automatic things just pulls the wire up and down at a certain time. I wasn't sure what would keep a critter from pulling the string and opening the door up. Is there a solution that I am missing with the door shutting. It seems that people are very content that the door is shut, but it doesn't seem predator proof?

    thanks for your help!
     
  4. beginnergirl

    beginnergirl Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Raccoons were very tricky at removing my hummingbird feeder. They opened carabiners, untwisted coat hanger wire that I would not be able to untwist without cutting myself and continually removed the feeder by unscrewing it.. I eventually bolted the feeder to the branch. They are smart and determined so if it is easy, they can figure it out.

    So I have locks on my run door, coop door and egg box door. Might be over doing it but I've seen evidence that something was on the window ledge looking in.
     
    Last edited: Oct 11, 2015
    1 person likes this.
  5. tdepointe

    tdepointe Chillin' With My Peeps

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    the automatic doors mount inside the coop including the lifting mechanics. They are metal with no edge for the raccoon to get a hold of. This makes them about as raccoon proof as possible.
     
  6. izziebean

    izziebean Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Interesting. I was looking at installing the Chicken Guard.. which I think is just the automation and string. I bought a flat metal cookie sheet yesterday at Kmart that I was going to use as the door. This is kind of what I was going for:

    http://s253.photobucket.com/user/kardar2/media/chicken coop/20150529_161658.mp4.html

    I found the video posted by another member of the forum. The other Chicken Guard pictures have shown the metal on the outside of the coop. Should I be switch to a different mechanism so that I can install the door on the inside? I mean, would that make it safer?

    Thanks!!
     
  7. tdepointe

    tdepointe Chillin' With My Peeps

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    The door the way he shows it, on the outside with the lip on top and exposed cable a raccoon would get in with no problem at all.
    If you move the door inside the coop and have door go below the opening by an inch or so it would be secure.
     
    1 person likes this.
  8. izziebean

    izziebean Chillin' With My Peeps

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    [​IMG] Thank you!!! I've been so worried about this. I did some more research and found this video:



    Looks as if they still put the chicken guard box on the outside but have the pulley and door mounted on the inside. I'm still learning but I'll get there.. hopefully soon. I don't think I"ll buy the chicken guard yet, but want it as an option later when I get tired of opening and closing the door. Now to figure out how to mount the stained glass window on the front. With that, I'm going to add hardware cloth behind it and plexi glass in front (for hail).

    P.S. Watching videos of 'coons attacking the chickens is very frightening. Fine line between letting the chickens run free and keeping them safe.
     
  9. tdepointe

    tdepointe Chillin' With My Peeps

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    This second design looks good and safe.
    Let me complement you on how you research before you actually start a project. This save a lot of headaches, and you end up with a better result
     
  10. DanEP

    DanEP Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have a similar set up with the door inside. Just make sure the door goes a little past the door opening and has a track on the bottom of the door as well as the sides. This will prevent anything from bowing the door in and possible poping it out of the tracks allowing access.
     

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