Coop Floor and Other design options

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by Bean789, Oct 7, 2014.

  1. Bean789

    Bean789 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have a "Daisy Coop", from purchased plans, with a 12 ft run and I am about to apply primer using a sprayer and then paint the coop the colors I have chosen. I plan on using linoleum on the treated plywood floor of the coop for ease of cleaning. The coop design had removable roosting boxes that I chose not to build and add to the coop floor. The 2 boxes do not cover the entire floor area and I would still need to clean around the outside edges and of course, the girls will be perching on the edges and pooping on the edges of the boxes anyway onto the floor. I added the diagonal 2 X 4s for roosting.

    1. I need to know best way to install the linoleum in order to prevent any water or vapor moisture from accumulating between the plywood and the linoleum material. Should I frame the outside edges with furring strips or 1 X 2s? The entire coop will have at least 1 coat of primer, 2 coats on the underside of the main coop and under the roof of the run that do not show. I know in a house the flooring is normally glued down but I don't want to do this in case I need to remove it later. Should I drill some small holes in the plywood before laying down the flooring? If I primer the treated plywood with 2 coats, will moisture build up between the layers and cause rotting issues later? That is my main concern. This coop was very expensive to build and I want it to last a very very very long time.

    2. Also, as the coop run has a shingled roof, the girls will have plenty of shade and cross breezes and more than half of it is under the drip line of a shade tree. I don't know if I want to leave the bottom of the actual coop area as part of their run, or maybe their dust bath area or enclose it somehow for storage. There is only a 2 ft clearance area and crawling under it to retrieve a sick/injured chicken or clean the dusting area, or....???....might be an issue for this old lady. LOL Any suggestions on how to best utilize this space?

    3. I have 2 rolls of 4 ft. X 50 ft. hardware cloth and hoping this will be enough to finish out this coop. Do I run strips vertically or horizontally when installing the hardware cloth? I need to utilize as much of it as possible to also bury approx. 18" to 24" skirt around the bottom. The run roof is approximately 6 ft at it's highest point in front. The front of the coop will get flower boxes and deck flooring by the door and the egg collection areas that will extend out at least 18 ", if not more and hopefully deter digging predators but the backside and ends will need the full on predator proofing. We have opossums and raccoon in our area.

    4. How long do I allow the primer/paint to dry and cure before housing the chicks/pullets in there. Don't want fumes giving them the vapors! (Home Depot associate didn't know since it was chickens and not kids. I asked...is there a difference?? [​IMG])

    I will also be adding another coop to the other end in the very near future. Eventually, this set up will house a total of 14 chickens and 4 guineas. (And to think this started with 5 chicks, then 8, then 'gotta have a blue Silkie', 'gotta have some guineas and some chicks to raise together'....and then......) They should have plenty of room. I have 4 guinea chicks along with Blue AND Splash Silkies (how did that happen that we have 2 instead of 1?), Red Sex link, 2 Buff Orpingtons, another Barred Rock, all around the same age, currently in the brooder/makeshift run. They need to come out of there in another week as they have outgrown their current housing situation. I also have 8 pullets just beginning their egg laying in another coop. The guineas like high places to roost and the 2nd coop addition to the other end will not only lend them that option (it will be tall), but also give more room for the chickens to choose where they want to sleep at night. I have questions about who goes in first, the brooder chicks or the established pullets but that is another forum to explore.

    BTW, I cannot take credit for building this coop. A very nice man, carpenter by trade, built it for me and he did an awesome job. It only took him 2 & 1/2 days. I chose not to install actual windows, located in FL, and they were so expensive anyway. The windows will have 't bars' added to look like windows along with hardware cloth and screening and will have removable vinyl covers for the colder months here in FL (Yes, we get cold weather) and they will keep drafts from entering the lower level of the coop. The coop is designed to also have 1 X 2 vertical strips added for outside trim but I wanted to primer/paint before adding them. I also chose to add the shingled roof run area (vs a wire covered roof) and have it sloped towards the back of the coop away from the front door. This coop will be hopefully absolutely and positively predator proof when I am finished with it.

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    Last edited: Oct 7, 2014
  2. JackE

    JackE Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I would 'Scrap' the idea of using linoleum, if it was my coop. Over time, it will deteriorate, and start to come apart, and moisture will get under it. It's just not designed for outside use, with the weather extremes. Not to mention chickens scratching and clawing at it. Then, you will have have the fun task of removing the remnants of the crap covered linoleum. I read on this forum a couple of years ago, where some guy had put in the effort of cutting and laying linoleum. Then, within a week or two, the chickens had just shredded it to pieces. I would recommend using a product from Lowes. Blackjack #57. It's a rubberized roof coat product. If it can put up with exposure to the elements year round, protecting a roof. Protecting a chicken coop floor is nothing to it. Its very easy to apply, you just stir well, then pour a big dollop on the floor, and push it around with a roller. I've had this stuff down in my coop going on 5yrs, and it looks just like it did, when I first put it down. IMO, it's the best protector for a coop's wood floor you can get. I got my Blackjack in a 5gal bucket, but others have found it in 1gal cans.

    I would leave the area under the coop, open to the chickens. They will appreciate the shade. As far as installing your hardware cloth goes. I would go with one horizontal seam, instead of a bunch of vertical seams every 4 ft. Modern paint drys fast. Of course, temperature and humidity will have a lot to do with it. Paint when you have some warm sunny days, and you'll have no problems.

    Looks like you got a pretty nice coop there. But I would look to add more ventilation/fresh air flow to it. I would modify those big opening doors with some hardware clothed screens, to get more fresh air in there. Especially for the Florida summers.
     
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  3. kirghizstan

    kirghizstan Out Of The Brooder

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    What are the dimensions of the coop?
     
  4. Bean789

    Bean789 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Spring Hill, FL
    Thanks, JackE for the info and recommendations. I have never heard of the Black Jack 57 but just read up on it at their website.

    I am sure this coop was designed for all types of climates with each person modifying to suit their regions. I thought about those large back doors especially after the coop had been completed and the next day, with the doors closed, the coop floor was still slightly damp from the morning moisture even mid afternoon on a 90 degree day. It had rained the night before also. So, yep, will have to cut some windows for sure but will probably cut them closer to the top and more like a 8" X 24" vent size.

    You stated that you have had the Black Jack 57 type of flooring cover for many years now. Did you get cracks in the material initially after it had dried? Did you use 2 coats? Do you have issues with cleaning out the 'cracks' if that is the case? I don't intend to use a water hose in there but you never know. Do the chickens scratch it up at all especially around the entry/exit door ramp?
     
  5. Bean789

    Bean789 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 25, 2014
    Spring Hill, FL
    The coop is 4 X 8, the run is 5.5' (maybe 6 ft ?) by 12 ft. Both have a shingled roof.
     
  6. JackE

    JackE Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 26, 2010
    North Eastern Md.

    I did not get any cracks then, or even now. It looks like it did, when it was first done. I put down just one HEAVY coat. Just poured it on the floor, and pushed it around with a roller. I have had no problems with it coming up, or wearing off. It is really like a coat of rubber on the floor. It totally seals all floor seams, and the seam/gap where the walls meet the floor.
    It is kinda exposed at the pop-door, and last time I looked, it was still there. The main thing with the Blackjack, is to STIR WELL. It really need to be mixed thoroughly. Can't just give it a coupla twists with the paint paddle and go. I heard from somebody that did that, and they had a real mess.
     
  7. petrel

    petrel Chats with Chickens

    I agree with the previous posts about adding ventilation. If you are concerned about rain getting in, you may want to consider "kick-out" vents. I don't know the proper term, but they are just windows that have shudders hinged at the top, so you can prop them out and they act as their own awning to keep out the elements. You can open them all the way on hot days, or just leave them partially propped open if you are expecting a blowing rain. My coop design is somewhat similar to yours, with big windows overlooking the run. I added the back vents to enhance air flow without having it blow directly on the birds when they are on the roost.

    With regard to surface treatments, we used a Sherwin-Williams exterior opaque stain that the store representative said was a good fit for treated lumber that may not be completely dried. We used it inside and out, including the floor. The chicken's can't hurt it and it cleans up easily. We were sure to leave the coop in the hot sun for about a week to cure until the odor of the stain was not so prominent.

    That is a nice looking coop, and very sturdily built! Looks like it will be home to some happy chickens soon.
     
    Last edited: Oct 7, 2014
  8. Bean789

    Bean789 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Spring Hill, FL
    Thanks to all who responded! I so much appreciate the advice and recommendations. I think the Black Jack 57 will work on the flooring just fine and hopefully save the floor from future repair any time soon. I will probably add it to the bottom of the nesting boxes as well, if I can get in there with a roller and not get it all over the place and me. I used pressure treated plywood for the flooring and elsewhere instead of other recommendations and was worried about the separation factor even with the primer and paint applied. I also was thinking about the horizontal application for the hardware cloth but just needed some 'back up' suggestions.

    I have marked out the new vents for the large back doors and hope to get them cut out this weekend before I primer the entire coop and paint it the next day. I am anxious to get those baby chicks out of their temp run and get the established 8 girls in their new home as well.

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  9. Great looking coop.

    I have a Blackjack #57 floor too. I love it. You can also use a paving broom instead of a roller for tough spots. I had preinstalled roosts and ladders to work around. I went up the walls about 2 ft. (prob should have gone halfway up) I wish I had thought about the nest boxes too.
     
  10. Bean789

    Bean789 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 25, 2014
    Spring Hill, FL
    Thanks! Yes, up the walls would certainly help as well. I had the builder enclose as much of the inside 2 X 4 framing so that the chickens couldn't poop on them and then me have to scrub and scrub to clean it off.
     

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