Corid and coccidia question

bhawk-23

Crowing
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Apr 12, 2020
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East Central Illinois
So I did a complete clean out of coops and run. The next morning I saw a very very small bloody poop in the 4 week old silkie pen. I brought a sample including that one and random samplings of poop from under perches and on the floor to the U of I Avian vet. They determined a small amount of coccidia but such a small amount that they do not advise me to do anything unless I see more bloody poop or a chick/chicken acting a little sick. As of this point, 3 days after sample was tested, I have not found anymore bloody poop nor are any chickens acting sick. We did switch the chicks over to medicated chick starter just in case the others needed a boost to their systems.

My question is: Should I still treat the flock for prevention? I know the medicated feed does not treat an infection, just helps to prevent it in chicks if fed from the start. I have read horror stories about entire flocks being lost to this but wouldn't the vet have suggested a treatment if there was a significant amount seen? It has been unusually wet lately and no matter how many clean containers of water I provide, like seriously, throughout the whole yard, they still gravitate to the rain puddles.

All chickens/chicks have access to each other if that matters. We keep the chicks in the coop where the hens lay.

Thanks!
 
Having lost young chickens to coccidia, I don't hesitate to treat for it, especially at the first sign of bloody poop. I understand all the advice that chickens need to build resistance, but coccidia can be deadly so I'd rather stay on top of it and let them gradually encounter it as they grow and develop stronger immune systems. If it's early and mild, Corid can work just fine...it "handicaps" the coccidia while you hope the immune system develops and fights it. For severe cases and something to have in your arsenal, Baycox (toltrazuril) which is also sold by avian supply places as Endocox actually kills coccidia. For prevention during chick raising or mild cases, I use Corid but if I see bloody poops and/or any lethargic or "ain't doing right" chicks/chickens I go for the toltrazuril to kill it. Probiotics after treatment are always a good idea.
 
Having lost young chickens to coccidia, I don't hesitate to treat for it, especially at the first sign of bloody poop. I understand all the advice that chickens need to build resistance, but coccidia can be deadly so I'd rather stay on top of it and let them gradually encounter it as they grow and develop stronger immune systems. If it's early and mild, Corid can work just fine...it "handicaps" the coccidia while you hope the immune system develops and fights it. For severe cases and something to have in your arsenal, Baycox (toltrazuril) which is also sold by avian supply places as Endocox actually kills coccidia. For prevention during chick raising or mild cases, I use Corid but if I see bloody poops and/or any lethargic or "ain't doing right" chicks/chickens I go for the toltrazuril to kill it. Probiotics after treatment are always a good idea.
Thank you. Where does everyone buy corid? Our local farm stores sell in large quantities for Bovine use. I have not found any for chickens which is why I'm asking if it's absolutely necessary at this point.
 
Thank you. Where does everyone buy corid? Our local farm stores sell in large quantities for Bovine use. I have not found any for chickens which is why I'm asking if it's absolutely necessary at this point.
Found this article somewhere on here. But this is the ratio for chickens with the 9.6% liquid solution. Someone also told me you can give them 1 ml per pound undiluted directly to them to jump start the process and help them quickly.
 

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Thank you. Where does everyone buy corid? Our local farm stores sell in large quantities for Bovine use. I have not found any for chickens which is why I'm asking if it's absolutely necessary at this point.
I find packets of Corid powder at Tractor Supply or locally-owned feed store, but it is widely available at various on-line poultry supply places...and Amazon. It doesn't have to be labelled for chickens; they only make 9.6% solution or 20% powder, either of which can be used for various livestock. You'll probably get widely varying opinions on whether it's really necessary at this point, with just one chicken showing symptoms...some keepers are against using any medication unless they are sure it's absolutely necessary (or even then, wanting only chickens who can fight things off) and others (me!) have lost chickens to coccidia so are quicker to jump to treatmet, even if it's preventative. Right now I'm growing a bunch out in a run that is staying wet from us getting a lot of rain so I'm not taking any chances with them as those are prime conditions for coccidia in young chickens. For you at this point, a good argument could be made either way.
 
Thank you. Where does everyone buy corid? Our local farm stores sell in large quantities for Bovine use. I have not found any for chickens which is why I'm asking if it's absolutely necessary at this point.
I get mine from TSC, & the bottle's instructions include instructions for poultry, not just cows, & sheep.
 
I find packets of Corid powder at Tractor Supply or locally-owned feed store, but it is widely available at various on-line poultry supply places...and Amazon. It doesn't have to be labelled for chickens; they only make 9.6% solution or 20% powder, either of which can be used for various livestock. You'll probably get widely varying opinions on whether it's really necessary at this point, with just one chicken showing symptoms...some keepers are against using any medication unless they are sure it's absolutely necessary (or even then, wanting only chickens who can fight things off) and others (me!) have lost chickens to coccidia so are quicker to jump to treatmet, even if it's preventative. Right now I'm growing a bunch out in a run that is staying wet from us getting a lot of rain so I'm not taking any chances with them as those are prime conditions for coccidia in young chickens. For you at this point, a good argument could be made either way.
I'll call around for the packets. They will be good to have on hand incase this turns bad or for future incidents.

Currently, I have no hens or "teenager" chicks showing symptoms.

Of the 4 week old chicks one seems a bit quieter but still eating/drinking/preening/poopingand keeping up with the others.

Still no suspicious poops at this point either.

I think I may have just been lucky this time.
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