Could internal laying/EYP be related to feed? and... Best way to euthanize?

Freia

Chirping
8 Years
Jan 11, 2012
134
7
93
I have a lovely flock that I inherited from some neighbors 18 months ago. they were old when I got them.

In the past 18 months, I have had 2 succomb to EYP. I have another that definitely has EYP, and 2 more that I think might be in the early phases of it.

I was at the feed store getting some replacement chicks yesterday, and mentioned it to them. They asked if I was providing high quality feed, theorizing that if a hen doesn't get adequate nutrition, then the burden of producing so many eggs might be taking a massive toll on the body to where the body can no longer sustain itself and function correctly. I thought it was an interesting theory. I've been suspecting that maybe the GMO grains or other things that were never really meant for chickens found in our feeds might encourage growth of ovarian tumors in hens.

Anybody have any ideas about this?

Here's what my plan is to try to reduce the incidence of EYP in the future - am I on the right track?

- I feed a high-quality feed - not perfect, but a good one: Nutrena NatureWise. It has probiotics, prebiotics, flax, Omega 3's etc. They also free-range forage and get my organic kitchen-scraps.

- As I'm replacing the birds, I'm only getting breeds that aren't bred for quite the massive production-rates as the birds I've lost. My idea is that a bird who produces a little less might have a better chance of keeping her girl-parts in working order. The birds I've lost / losing are RIRs, Buff Orpingtons, Barred Rocks. The replacement chicks I've gotten are: Turken, Mottled Java, Iowa Blue, Wellsummer, Ameracauna, and Salmon Faverolle. Yes, I have quite the eclectic flock. So far, the Java is my favorite. not the best layer, but what a tough, solid bird.

And lastly, what is the best way to put a bird out of its misery? I recognize the symptoms of EYP well enough now that I know when they are suffering at the point of no return. My Mom always just did the head on the chopping block with an axe, followed by blood spraying everywhere - I can't do that. I know someone who wrung the neck, only to have the pitiful thing actually survive it. I'm thinking of putting a sock over her head so I don't have to look her in the eyes and slitting her throat. Any suggestion would be most appreciated.
 

loveourbirds

Songster
6 Years
Mar 27, 2013
2,857
323
198
waverly ohio
yes diet and even your water can play a part in it. I too have wondered about gmo's and sprays we use. every day we are finding that what we thought was a good thing is bad for us.

since water is the easiest place to start, have you tested your waters ph? chickens do best when water is slightly acidic ph of 6.5 to 7. 7 is neutral. if your water is over 7 that can contribute to the problem. the higher ph sometimes inhibits proper calcium absorbtion. if your water tests high, you can add a little unpasteurized apple cider vinegar one day each week to help your girls along.

its funny, I just done another post on this, and I look for someone to argue with me. but when I was looking at how to mix our feed here, I talked to several feed stores who grind their own "mash". I don't know if every place does this or not, but one told me that they mixed lime in their feed for calcium. I later tested his feed by mixing it with deionized water with a ph of 7. I boiled it, strained it and tested the ph and it came out to nearly 8. I do admit im not a chemist and my findings could be off. but, if my findings are right, over a period of time this too could lower the ph of your birds, inhibiting calcium absorbtion.

people do tend to argue on what is the best protein for chickens, for active birds you would most certainly need more. I recommend a protein of about 18% we do drop to 16% in the winter and add more sunflower for fat.

keep in mind im just a hillbilly who raises chickens, someone else may know far more about this.
 

dawg53

Humble
Premium Feather Member
12 Years
Nov 27, 2008
27,606
13,603
886
Glen St Mary, Florida
I have a lovely flock that I inherited from some neighbors 18 months ago. they were old when I got them.

In the past 18 months, I have had 2 succomb to EYP. I have another that definitely has EYP, and 2 more that I think might be in the early phases of it.

I was at the feed store getting some replacement chicks yesterday, and mentioned it to them. They asked if I was providing high quality feed, theorizing that if a hen doesn't get adequate nutrition, then the burden of producing so many eggs might be taking a massive toll on the body to where the body can no longer sustain itself and function correctly. I thought it was an interesting theory. I've been suspecting that maybe the GMO grains or other things that were never really meant for chickens found in our feeds might encourage growth of ovarian tumors in hens.

Anybody have any ideas about this?

Here's what my plan is to try to reduce the incidence of EYP in the future - am I on the right track?

- I feed a high-quality feed - not perfect, but a good one: Nutrena NatureWise. It has probiotics, prebiotics, flax, Omega 3's etc. They also free-range forage and get my organic kitchen-scraps.

- As I'm replacing the birds, I'm only getting breeds that aren't bred for quite the massive production-rates as the birds I've lost. My idea is that a bird who produces a little less might have a better chance of keeping her girl-parts in working order. The birds I've lost / losing are RIRs, Buff Orpingtons, Barred Rocks. The replacement chicks I've gotten are: Turken, Mottled Java, Iowa Blue, Wellsummer, Ameracauna, and Salmon Faverolle. Yes, I have quite the eclectic flock. So far, the Java is my favorite. not the best layer, but what a tough, solid bird.

And lastly, what is the best way to put a bird out of its misery? I recognize the symptoms of EYP well enough now that I know when they are suffering at the point of no return. My Mom always just did the head on the chopping block with an axe, followed by blood spraying everywhere - I can't do that. I know someone who wrung the neck, only to have the pitiful thing actually survive it. I'm thinking of putting a sock over her head so I don't have to look her in the eyes and slitting her throat. Any suggestion would be most appreciated.
Speckledhen is the expert on EYP: Here's a link, post #5: You can read plenty more of her posts regarding EYP if you wish. Use the search box.
https://www.backyardchickens.com/t/640589/dead-hen-i-think-eyp
 
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