Cull or Vaccinate? What would you do?

Cull or Vaccinate

  • Cull the entire flock

    Votes: 3 33.3%
  • Cull birds showing symptoms and vaccinate those not showing symptoms

    Votes: 5 55.6%
  • Do nothing

    Votes: 1 11.1%

  • Total voters
    9

ThatTeowonna

Chirping
Oct 12, 2020
160
269
83
Columbia, SC
Bad news! Infectious Laryngotracheitis (LT) has invaded my flock of 8 chickens (now 7 since my rooster died last Sunday). My rooster started exhibiting symptoms similar to a chicken I lost a month ago. I bought them both from the same farm. I took my dead rooster to our local extension program who confirmed today (after necropsy) that my rooster had LT. The Dr. came to my house today to give me a quarantine notice: nothing relating to my chicks can leave my home within 30 days of the last culled chicken or last chicken stops showing signs. This things is serious. It is a herpes virus and while some chicks may survive it, it can recur.

She gave me three options: 1. cull the entire flock (which she thinks is best); 2. cull any that show signs (so far, one other chicken); 3. vaccinate any chicken that isn't showing signs, they haven't been exposed (this would be free of charge). I can do any one of these, a combination, or nothing at all.

If I decide to cull, she will do it on my property for me. It would be my responsibility to burn or bury. What would you do? I've only been a chicken keeper since Sept. 2020. She said this is only the 7th case in her 24-year career. That's 2020 for ya!
 

Lacy Duckwing

Crowing
Nov 6, 2017
1,439
4,089
312
Maine
My Coop
This is really sad. :hit I remember when I got plagued with with Merricks disease or Blackhead disease, or maybe it was both. This is hard. Two out of three of my vaccinated chickens survived the Merricks. Then sometime later, I heard that vaccinating them only hide the synthoms, but doesn't prevent them from getting it. Sorry, but I don't want to make this choice for you, because you might regret. I hope that this doesn't ruin it for you forever. One thing, most likely the chickens came with it, so it's not your fault. Whoever you got your chickens from probably has it on their farm. Something probably should be said to stop the spread and save other people from getting into the same situation. I hope this ends up ending well for you. :hugs
 

Waves

I feed chickens with italian pizza. No,I'm joking!
Premium Feather Member
Apr 16, 2019
817
2,430
237
Centre of Italy
Bad news! Infectious Laryngotracheitis (LT) has invaded my flock of 8 chickens (now 7 since my rooster died last Sunday). My rooster started exhibiting symptoms similar to a chicken I lost a month ago. I bought them both from the same farm. I took my dead rooster to our local extension program who confirmed today (after necropsy) that my rooster had LT. The Dr. came to my house today to give me a quarantine notice: nothing relating to my chicks can leave my home within 30 days of the last culled chicken or last chicken stops showing signs. This things is serious. It is a herpes virus and while some chicks may survive it, it can recur.

She gave me three options: 1. cull the entire flock (which she thinks is best); 2. cull any that show signs (so far, one other chicken); 3. vaccinate any chicken that isn't showing signs, they haven't been exposed (this would be free of charge). I can do any one of these, a combination, or nothing at all.

If I decide to cull, she will do it on my property for me. It would be my responsibility to burn or bury. What would you do? I've only been a chicken keeper since Sept. 2020. She said this is only the 7th case in her 24-year career. That's 2020 for ya!

I'm not sure if last year i had something similar in my flock, but it was something that sounded like this. I lost two chickens to this but I didn't cull anyone...i can't do it. It was too much for me! But if you don't cull, please keep your flock closed: respiratory viruses of all types (i understood so, but if someone can confirm i would really appreciate)remain in the chickens.
Sometimes my chickens seem to have "cold", but if i see that they are rattling or sneezing too much i give them 1 pill of a homeopatic remedy that i found on the book "Poultry Doctor". I don't know if i can write the name here. I see some improvements but i can't guarantee it would work on your chickens too.
At the moment i'm keeping all under control and i hope all will go well :fl:fl:fl:fl

I really understand you :hugs:hugs:hugs:hugs
 

Eggcessive

Enabler
Premium Feather Member
Apr 3, 2011
57,648
48,707
1,202
southern Ohio
I tend to agree with culling the whole flock of 7 hens. ILT is a reportable disease in most states, and any exposed chickens can become carriers for life. It causes blood-tinged mucus to come out of the beak, coughing, wheezing, and gasping. It was most likely brought in by one of the birds you brought in recently. Clean up any droppings in the area and disinfect equipment. I would start over with baby chicks from a reputable hatchery in a few months. Sorry that you are dealing with this chronic disease.
 

Sally PB

Songster
Premium Feather Member
Aug 7, 2020
1,891
4,521
233
Belding, MI
While it's a terrible, sad thing, I think culling may be the best option. I am so sorry. I have really enjoyed your posts, and hope you get more chickens and have a better experience. :hugsHugs.
 

roosterhavoc

Enabler
Jan 5, 2012
21,355
54,060
1,101
I’m definitely leaning towards culling. It’s disappointing because my flock was just starting to gel.
Culling them definitely sucks but in the long run I think you’ll be better off. Down the line you can have healthy birds that don’t have issues. Like was already mentioned I would buy chicks from one of the big hatcheries or better yet get eggs and hatch your own. While there’s some diseases transferable from eggs the risk is much lower. Good luck.
 

ThatTeowonna

Chirping
Oct 12, 2020
160
269
83
Columbia, SC
Culling them definitely sucks but in the long run I think you’ll be better off. Down the line you can have healthy birds that don’t have issues. Like was already mentioned I would buy chicks from one of the big hatcheries or better yet get eggs and hatch your own. While there’s some diseases transferable from eggs the risk is much lower. Good luck.
Agreed... culling is best. The expense of starting over is discouraging but I know I will. Thanks for the feedback.
 

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