Deep litter-how much depth to account for when building a new coop?

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by gale65, Aug 24, 2011.

  1. gale65

    gale65 Chillin' With My Peeps

    We've decided we'll use the deep litter method in the new coop. Will 6" or so be enough depth to account for the shavings or does it need to be deeper? I can put a barrier in front of the walk door without any trouble but too big of a barrier in front of the pop door will block too much of it (which is why we settled on sand in our current coop). I'd rather put the pop door up high enough in the first place to allow the depth we need.

    eta: is linoleum or paint on the floor ok for this? The coop will be raised about 6" off the ground and have a wood floor but I can either paint it or put down linoleum if I can find the right size remnant for not too much $$.

    eta again: if we have wall mounted feeders do I need to worry about the varying floor depth? Do I need to make them adjustable or something or do they adapt? Or maybe put bricks in when it's low and take them away when it's higher? How deep does it really get?
     
    Last edited: Aug 24, 2011
  2. EggyErin

    EggyErin Chillin' With My Peeps

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    My chicken door is about 6-7" off the floor and I have an 8" litterboard inside the people door. My shavings probably stay in the 8" range. Sometimes the chickens get a little rowdy and throw shavings onto the door's ledge but it hasn't been a problem. The shavings are deepest under the roost and in the middle of the coop. I have one small wall feeder and it's probably 8" off the floor. Could stand to be higher, though shavings don't migrate too high underneath. My other feeder and waterer hang so I can raise them as the shavings get deeper. So far I've been happy with the arrangement. My coop floor is wood with a vinyl remnant (Home Depot-$45) on top. It's very easy to clean out the shavings and the composted parts.
     
  3. Ole rooster

    Ole rooster Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I don't guess I could do the deep litter method if I wanted to. My two doors are only 2 inches off the floor of the coop. But the area under the roost I suppose is the area most needed. I would have no problem there, but it won't work for me in the entire coop.
     
  4. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner Chicken Obsessed

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    There is not going to be a "standard" depth for all of us with the DLM. We will all vary. What I suggest is to make the bottom of th epop door at least a foot off the floor, and a bit more won't hurt. That gives you the flexibility to adjust. There is nothing that says you can't build a little step or put a paver or cinder block in front of it to give them a step if you need it, both inside and outside. Mine have no trouble jumping up to the nest 2 feet off the floor or getting to the roosts 4 feet off the floor. Mine have no trouble jumping up several inches to get to the pop door. I'd have to measure mine but I'd guess it is about 14" off the floor and ground.
     
  5. moetrout

    moetrout Chillin' With My Peeps

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    My people door and pop door are set at 8". I start with 3-4" of litter and add as needed throughout the season. I clean the coup twice a year in spring and fall. I usually have about 6" by the time I clean it. I make a habit of having a small rake out there to stir up the litter and will occassionally put down some DE. I add new litter as needed.
     
  6. gale65

    gale65 Chillin' With My Peeps

    thanks everyone. I think we'll go with 8 or 10 and just put a board in front of the walk door. I'm also going to use one of those cheap yardsticks they give out for free at the fair and nail it to the wall inside the walk door so we can monitor the depth without having to actually do any work. lol. Sorta like the ones at the doors at convenience stores but shorter.
     

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