Demon Hawk!!! PLEASE HELP

Erica99

Hatching
7 Years
Nov 20, 2012
1
0
7
PLEASE HELP! A hawk has been terrorizing our small flock for about a month and we do not know what to do it has already killed one of my bantams and several have been attacked one just this evening and she is still missing we found feathers but no blood. Currently I am having to keep my chickens in their coop and only let them out when supervised not promising that they will all go back in. We love our chickens and need SERIOUS help before all of them are dead. This is no ordinary hawk, it has come back on every other day to get a chicken and has even tried to attack my mother, if anyone has any ideas on what to do or you have had a similar situation please comment.
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spoildegg

Hatching
7 Years
May 28, 2012
7
1
7
I have had a few problem birds around my house. This is what I found when I was looking for this answer. Good luck!


Retrieved from http://www.unitedwildlife.com/AnimalsHawksOwls.html

All hawks and owls are federally protected under the Migratory Bird Treaty Act (16 USC, 703-711). These laws strictly prohibit the capture, killing, or possession of hawks or owls without special permit. No permits are required to scare depredating migratory birds except for endangered or threatened species (see Table 1), including bald and golden eagles. In addition, most states have regulations regarding hawks and owls. Some species may be common in one state but may be on a state endangered species list in another. Consult your local USDA-APHIS-Animal Damage Control, US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), and/or state wildlife department representatives for permit requirements and information. There are cases, however, in which they can create public health and safety hazards or seriously affect a person’s livelihood. Contact your local USDA-APHISADC office first if you are interested in obtaining a shooting permit. The USFWS and state wildlife agencies may issue shooting permits for problem hawks and owls if nonlethal methods of controlling damage have failed or are impractical and if it is determined that killing the offending birds will alleviate the problem.
 

TXchickmum

Crowing
8 Years
Apr 21, 2012
2,843
364
271
North Texas
We have a few hawks that are pretty determined, also. I've been buzzed by one of 'em, twice. We loved having the chickens out roaming all day (and I am certain they preferred it), but determined it was better to have them safely contained in a large, covered run. They have about three hours per day of free-range time (supervised). We especially stay close to the bantams. The rest of the time they are in the run (complete with dust bathing pit, two feeders, two waterers, multiple roosts, an plenty of fresh greens given daily).

I hope that you find a solution that works for you. A covered run is a geat way to keep away hawks.
 

cluck-darth-peep

In the Brooder
8 Years
Jun 28, 2011
37
0
21
upper ohio
I agree, hawks do not like crows. I have 2 fake plastic crows, 1 fake owl, and 1 fake HAWK.
Hawks are territorial. Get a fake hawk and put it outside the run.

Hawks do not like owls and crows, get a few fake ones. The trick: every 2 days, move the fake predators around the yard. If you keep them all in the same place, this will not "trick" the real hawk into thinking he is the prey.
I have 55 chickens. One falcon, and a set of male/female hawks had attempted attacks. Since putting up the fake birds, they do not come anywhere near my chickens nor have they attempted to fly over the property. I rarely even see them, but again, move the fake birds every 2 days.
 
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TXchickmum

Crowing
8 Years
Apr 21, 2012
2,843
364
271
North Texas
This seems to work for some. We placed a large owl decoy in our garden (and moved it about the lawn to different areas regularly). The owl was a tremendous deterrent to the Mockingbirds. -kept them out of the strawberry plants! It did nothing to deter the hawks. It's worth a try. Perhaps having multiple decoys is key. -just convinced that our two hawks were shrewd enough to distinguish the difference, and bold enough that our little garden ruse was of no consequence.
 

centrarchid

Crossing the Road
12 Years
Sep 19, 2009
26,451
18,021
876
Holts Summit, Missouri
First, do not free-range silkies and bantams without direct supervision. They are too small and limited in their abilities to avoid predation. With hawks, size means a lot.
 

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