Deworming & what to use?

Wyorp Rock

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At 0.23 ml per pound thats like 1 ml per bird, is that right?! That would dose a 50# goat.
For a 5lb bird that would be correct - 1ml.

Chickens are chickens. Goats are goats. They have different digestive systems.

If possible, I suggest that you see vet care. Ask your vet to perform a fecal float to confirm worms, then give you the medication they suggest along with written instructions on dosing.
 

dawg53

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At 0.23 ml per pound thats like 1 ml per bird, is that right?! That would dose a 50# goat.
In addition to what @Wyorp Rock stated, chickens metabolism runs at a higher rate than goats. Benzimidazoles are poorly absorbed into the bloodstream in birds and are mostly excreted. That's why there's a higher dosing rate, just enough to be absorbed into the bloodstream/just enough to kill the worms.
 

dawg53

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Is there anything that can be added to their water that all of them can just drink as a preventative type treatment? I've got 35 birds and there's just no way I'm spending my entire weekend spitting mad trying to catch them all and try to remember which I've dosed and which I still need to.
When you add a wormer to water, such as Levamisole, you dont know if it will be effective in treating all your birds.
Some birds may or may not drink it, some may not drink enough of it to be effective, and birds drink less in cooler/cold temps.

Direct dosing orally is best. That way you know they got properly wormed. Simply use a syringe without a needle and pull the hens wattles down and her mouth will open. Give only 1/2ml at a time and quickly release the wattles so she can swallow it on her own or she might aspirate.
Birds with no wattles, pull down the skin under the beak/upper neck. If they shake their head, hold on tight and they will tire.
Practice it first with someone holding a hen for you until you get the hang of it.

Also, there's nothing saying that you have to worm all your birds in one day. You can split your birds up by breed, for example:
The 1st day worm Barred Rocks, RIR's, Buff Orpingtons.
The 2nd day worm sex links, Leghorns.
The 3rd day worm the sick, lame, and lazy birds.
Or worm your birds by coop if you wish.

I prefer to worm birds early morning before dawn. Snatch one off the roost and worm them, one by one.
This is an effective way of eliminating worms before your chickens go to feed in the morning. The chickens will be starving, so will the worms. The worms will be at their weakest making the wormer more effective eliminating them.

Then wait about 3 hours before feeding your birds. Then feed them small amounts at a time gradually increasing their feed back to normal.
If you let your birds eat all at once, they will be starving and gorge the feed possibly causing impacted crop or gizzard.

Easy peasy.
 
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