AidKD

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Jul 6, 2020
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DE is a waste of money. Worms cannot survive outside their host. When excreted, they are either dead or are dying.
When the birds poop after being treated for coccidiosis the parasite that caused it is then expelled from their body. When you throw food on the ground to chickens they eat all kinds gross things... poop being one of them. Therefore the worm enters back into the body of the chicken and it restarts. DE has always worked for me. It's not a waste of money, in my opinion, if it helps keep your birds healthy.
 

cherrynberry

Chirping
Aug 2, 2020
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Do you ever give your chickens any tomatoes this time of year? They will have some bits in them that resemble intestinal shed.
Nope, but they got a few leaves off of my tomato plant...but only about 4 leaves per 13 chickens. (My tomatoes did not bear yet). We keep the plants in a gated area that is about 5 feet tall, but sometimes our easter egger chicks get in.
 

dawg53

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When the birds poop after being treated for coccidiosis the parasite that caused it is then expelled from their body. When you throw food on the ground to chickens they eat all kinds gross things... poop being one of them. Therefore the worm enters back into the body of the chicken and it restarts. DE has always worked for me. It's not a waste of money, in my opinion, if it helps keep your birds healthy.
Worms do not cause coccidiosis. Coccidia are protozoa. There are 9 types of coccidia that can infect chickens, two types cause blood in feces. All birds have coccidia. It's when it gets out of control is when there is a problem. Coccidia cannot be completely eliminated by Corid nor sulfa drugs.
Additionally, Corid is not the cure-all for coccidiossis infections. There are strains that do not respond to Corid. It's then necessary to use a sulfa drug such as sulfadimethoxine (prescription required) or SMZ-TMP, Albon , etc...

It's true that worm eggs are picked up from the soil. It's called the Direct lifecycle which covers all types of poultry roundworms.

Insects can be intermediate hosts for tapeworms and some types of roundworms. This is known as the Indirect lifecycle.
Certain insects are intermediate hosts for flukes as well, such as dragonflies and snails.
DE will not prevent nor treat coccidiosis nor worms.

I hope this helps in discerning the difference between coccidia and worms.

https://poultry.extension.org/articles/poultry-health/internal-parasites-of-poultry/
 
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cherrynberry

Chirping
Aug 2, 2020
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Just to do a little update, the chickens are still waiting for the corid to come, but they have not been having anymore poops like the first, but they do sometimes get diarrhea. Images below...
 

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klbaker75

Chirping
Apr 4, 2019
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Just a note - coccidia is found in poop and in soil - it's in their environment. Chicks do start building resistance, but sometimes they can become overloaded and do need treatment with a Coccidiostat like Corid.
@Wyorp Rock I have three 17-week olds that I had to move to new ground to get away from gapeworm and although the new area didn't have gapeworm, it had the e tenella/cecal coccidia in that area. The chicks never had any symptoms (I only found it by accident on a fecal that I do myself here). I rarely test the cecal stools so I can't be sure how long she had it, maybe 1-2 weeks. The other two started with it about 5 days after I found hers, so I did start them all on Corid and move them to concrete to get away from the infected soil. I currently have them in an area indoors where I can keep the bedding cleaned out so they don't reinfect themselves.

Your comment makes me wonder if it's okay to let them just have it, as long as there isn't any blood. She had quite a bit of oocysts on the sample. I'm actually not sure why she didn't have blood to be honest since it seemed like quite a load. They are on day three of the Corid today and so far I'm still seeing the oocysts but maybe half as many as prior to Corid. I'll finish out the treatment but if they still have it afterwards, is it okay to just leave them with it?? Is it possible to get immunity when they have so much on fecal? That's why I treated her to begin with bc of the amount. I can't imagine having that much wouldn't do some serious damage eventually. I had a young rooster two years ago with it and stopped seeing blood and thought I had gotten rid of it. But he ended up dying a few months later from both overload of capillaria and coccidia causing severe anemia and internal damage. I'm just not sure what to do since I don't always trust symptoms or lack thereof.
 

Wyorp Rock

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@Wyorp Rock I have three 17-week olds that I had to move to new ground to get away from gapeworm and although the new area didn't have gapeworm, it had the e tenella/cecal coccidia in that area. The chicks never had any symptoms (I only found it by accident on a fecal that I do myself here). I rarely test the cecal stools so I can't be sure how long she had it, maybe 1-2 weeks. The other two started with it about 5 days after I found hers, so I did start them all on Corid and move them to concrete to get away from the infected soil. I currently have them in an area indoors where I can keep the bedding cleaned out so they don't reinfect themselves.

Your comment makes me wonder if it's okay to let them just have it, as long as there isn't any blood. She had quite a bit of oocysts on the sample. I'm actually not sure why she didn't have blood to be honest since it seemed like quite a load. They are on day three of the Corid today and so far I'm still seeing the oocysts but maybe half as many as prior to Corid. I'll finish out the treatment but if they still have it afterwards, is it okay to just leave them with it?? Is it possible to get immunity when they have so much on fecal? That's why I treated her to begin with bc of the amount. I can't imagine having that much wouldn't do some serious damage eventually. I had a young rooster two years ago with it and stopped seeing blood and thought I had gotten rid of it. But he ended up dying a few months later from both overload of capillaria and coccidia causing severe anemia and internal damage. I'm just not sure what to do since I don't always trust symptoms or lack thereof.
There's only a couple of strains that present as blood, so likely you may not see blood.
What do you mean you think you should let them have it? Have what?

Are the birds even showing symptoms of being sick? Finish the treatment of Corid since you started it.
 

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