Do Guineas attract more predator attention?

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by pontoosuc, Jul 22, 2010.

  1. pontoosuc

    pontoosuc Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Richmond, MA
    We have 14 chickens in a nice coop with a pretty good run. They are in the run during the day
    then locked in the coop at night.

    Our 8 guineas will soon move from the brooder into the coop in a close, but separate area.
    The plan is to have the guineas free range during the day, and into the coop for the night.

    Question:

    Will these guineas cause more attention from predators than our chickens currently do with all
    the racket and noise? I guess in writing this I'm coming to the conclusion that, yes, they will draw
    in more predators.......

    Will the guineas be worth the risk?
     
  2. Lbrad7

    Lbrad7 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    They will definitely attract more attention from your neighbors! They are loud and obnoxious but I loved mine. I tried free ranging them during the day but the soon traded in the barn roosts for the trees. It took a couple years but foxes finally wiped my crew out but I still really enjoyed them.

    Don't mix them with your chickens if you have any roos..they will run the roo to death.
     
  3. Anguissette

    Anguissette Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I know my grandmother's flock of about 30 guineas keep the predators AWAY. Good lord they are like winged vengence! They will even group up and kill snakes. I pray mine turn out like them!
     
  4. Lollipop

    Lollipop Chillin' With My Peeps

    Wouldn`t it be nice if they were all like Granny`s and chased off predators. I started with 20 last July and now have 3. Something has been getting them during the day as they free range. The few remaining are so scared they hardly make any noise at all. They are safe at night as they roost in the rafters of my pole barn, but usually range far and wide til recently. Now they stay within 100 yards of the barn. I don`t think they attract any MORE predators, but they sure feed a bunch of them. Nothing has tried to get into my chicken pens at all. I live on the side of a mountain, in the woods, so I guess I should expect it........Pop
     
  5. zazouse

    zazouse Overrun With Chickens

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    They may attract attention at first but believe me nothing wants to be near a group of screaming guineas, mine are the biggest tattle tails on my place.

    i have seen mine harass a full grown coon before, she could not get away fast enough.
     
  6. aggieterpkatie

    aggieterpkatie Chillin' With My Peeps

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    *knock on wood* I've never lost a bird to a predator. I saw a fox trotting behind the fence one day and yelled to scare him off. I have guineas too, and they're noisy at times. So, in my opinion, I dont' think they'll draw more predators.
     
  7. noodleroo

    noodleroo Snuggles with Chickens

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    Guineas are a lot more predator savvy than chickens. And they can fly better to get away, too. Plus they are really loud when startled. The only thing that mine had to look out for was our neighbor that would routinely back out of his driveway in a hurry while one was resting behind his vehicle.
     
  8. darkmatter

    darkmatter Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:Me too, my Guineas a few years ago got whittled down to just males from predators taking the hens at night off the nests in the fields they laid (stupid guineas won't nest in the coop). It takes a while to build up predator savvy Guineas, after you get a few that have survived a couple years----they teach the youngun's what to watch out for. I found it best to take the guinea eggs from the nests when you can find them and use either/or broody hens and incubator to hatch them out and raise them to fully feathered before introducing them to the combined flock. Young keets have a hard time surviving hypothermia from wetting by morning dew in the grass. Once they are 4 weeks old or so, they're hardier.
     
  9. Lollipop

    Lollipop Chillin' With My Peeps

    Quote:Sure hope that proves to be true at my place. I think these 3 are all males and now they are a year old. I have some pullets growing that should make fine henabators next year. I too found that guinea nests are destroyed with great frequency. I plan to pen the guinea hens and release the keets when they are old enough.
     
  10. pontoosuc

    pontoosuc Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Appreciate everyones input here.

    I guess it will be a day to day experience. TU
     

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