Do I buy an all inclusive brooder or?

Ridgerunner

Crossing the Road
12 Years
Feb 2, 2009
28,296
23,599
907
Southeast Louisiana
My husband has accepted this will be a regular thing so now building a 3 x 12 3 foot tall addition along the front side for brooding, which can be divided into 3 for medical/timeout needs.
Great, I love the flexibility.

If the floor is elevated you can put a wire floor in one or more of those sections and have a broody buster as well as for medical/behavioral reasons. My permanent 3' x 6' brooder has 1/2" hardware floor and is up off of the coop floor. The poop falls through until the chicks are maybe 12 weeks old so it stays really clean and dry with chicks. With adults you have to clean poop, it won't all go through.

In winter I put a piece of plywood under the heat lamp to give them good wind protection from underneath and to retain some heat better. I just dump the poop off of that. And I hang plastic to stop breezes. In summer I do less.

Some (not all, but some) wire mesh can have sharp points on it that can tear up the feet. Check before you install it. All those points should be on the same side so if your wire has it point that side down.

I'll include a couple of photos so you can see what I'm talking about.

Brooder Bins.JPG


Brooder.JPG
 

Kurczaklover

Songster
Dec 3, 2021
75
350
116
Great, I love the flexibility.

If the floor is elevated you can put a wire floor in one or more of those sections and have a broody buster as well as for medical/behavioral reasons. My permanent 3' x 6' brooder has 1/2" hardware floor and is up off of the coop floor. The poop falls through until the chicks are maybe 12 weeks old so it stays really clean and dry with chicks. With adults you have to clean poop, it won't all go through.

In winter I put a piece of plywood under the heat lamp to give them good wind protection from underneath and to retain some heat better. I just dump the poop off of that. And I hang plastic to stop breezes. In summer I do less.

Some (not all, but some) wire mesh can have sharp points on it that can tear up the feet. Check before you install it. All those points should be on the same side so if your wire has it point that side down.

I'll include a couple of photos so you can see what I'm talking about.

View attachment 2951479

View attachment 2951481
The intention is to put it in front of the coop pictured below, in the space between door into coop on right, door into run on left. I love the idea of putting it 2 feet off the ground with hinged tin roof. Now rethinking, 3'x10'x2'. 12'tin to give nice overhang. Couple of clear dollar tree shower curtains can be anchored with scrap 2x4 when it needs to be draft free. But the question remains is there a workable way to put a small entry point into the run for the babies? If I put a ramp into it, can young chicks still make it in fast enough if they need to escape a big girl? I do like the idea if them integrating naturally when they are ready. The toy box house will go inside on the far left.
 

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Ridgerunner

Crossing the Road
12 Years
Feb 2, 2009
28,296
23,599
907
Southeast Louisiana
But the question remains is there a workable way to put a small entry point into the run for the babies? If I put a ramp into it, can young chicks still make it in fast enough if they need to escape a big girl?
I personally don't believe in ramps that much except for chickens that can't fly, like Silkies, or in special cases. Ramps are a tool that have their place. Many people would be surprised at how well a two-week-old chick can fly, especially when they are motivated. There is a reason wing feathers come in first.

I can understand you being uneasy and that run looks pretty small for integrating. My first thought was to build a wire "box" at the base of the ramp that encompasses the entire ramp and put your entry hole in that box at ground level. But that reduces run space. In your situation I'd build a run extension next to that run with a human door between the two that you can eave open when they are integrated. You will need access to that area. Put your entry hole in that fence also. Have your brooder open into that. Essentially you are building a separate run for that brooder that can be incorporated into your main run after they are integrated.
 

Kurczaklover

Songster
Dec 3, 2021
75
350
116
I personally don't believe in ramps that much except for chickens that can't fly, like Silkies, or in special cases. Ramps are a tool that have their place. Many people would be surprised at how well a two-week-old chick can fly, especially when they are motivated. There is a reason wing feathers come in first.

I can understand you being uneasy and that run looks pretty small for integrating. My first thought was to build a wire "box" at the base of the ramp that encompasses the entire ramp and put your entry hole in that box at ground level. But that reduces run space. In your situation I'd build a run extension next to that run with a human door between the two that you can eave open when they are integrated. You will need access to that area. Put your entry hole in that fence also. Have your brooder open into that. Essentially you are building a separate run for that brooder that can be incorporated into your main run after they are integrated.
The run is over 400 sq feet, and presently the flock only spends about the first hour of the day in it, they have 2 acres they free range in. You have given me food for thought, and I so appreciate it. I have 4 months to plan and execute, so back to the drawing board!
 

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