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Do you have a Roo with your flock?

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by Devon07, Jul 31, 2014.

  1. Yes, we have one or more.

    13 vote(s)
    68.4%
  2. No, we dont want any.

    1 vote(s)
    5.3%
  3. Yes, we want one but cant have one.

    2 vote(s)
    10.5%
  4. No, and we cant have one.

    1 vote(s)
    5.3%
  5. One the fence about it.

    1 vote(s)
    5.3%
  6. Take it or leave it.

    1 vote(s)
    5.3%
  1. Devon07

    Devon07 Chirping

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    Okay, after doing a little reading on BYC I was kind of surprised at some of the replies as to how bad a rooster experience was to some, I understand it....I also understand the good side of things with a roo, this got me to thinking and I'm curious as to how many think a roo is valuable to the flock and how many just dont care one way or the other and/or how many wont have one.

    This shouldn't be a debate....it's more to help someone decide if a roo may be right for them .....opinions are welcome but lets not make it about who is right or wrong and more about who, How and Why one works out or doesnt for you.

    When someone is curious about possibly getting a roo, I feel mixed because Im having such a great experience with mine and many have may an opposite experience or opinion, I feel like someone could miss out on a great experience with one because someone else thought it was bad...and may have been but "for them" this is why this shouldnt be a debate....because its a indivdual experience...a bad roo may not be bad to someone else, a good one may be bad to some.....on and on and on.

    Okay lets give it a shot. [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jul 31, 2014
  2. Ol Grey Mare

    Ol Grey Mare One egg shy of a full carton. ..... Premium Member

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    My Coop
    At the moment, yes - but he is on his way out -- it has nothing to do with bad experiences (had lovely experiences with roos previously), but more to do with the fact that this time around I am choosing to maintain a female flock. I do not wish to keep a rooster, and I went into this flock with the intent of not having one. We ended up with one roo in our batch of 16 chicks we started this year - and I allowed myself to be talked into keeping him, and have since rethought that.
    For me, the only actual value of a rooster over a hen in the flock (based on my own personal experience) is fertility. At this time I have no desire to hatch chicks, I have seen just as much, if not more, protection, foraging help, etc from hens as I have from roosters in my previous flocks that had roosters (since the "pros" of a roo are often cited as protection, helping hen find food, etc), if I choose to hatch birds I do not wish to do so with this roo - so fertility is not a bonus on his count, I enjoy my girls and wish to do so without the presence of a rooster and I don't wish to pay for a bird in the flock that I am not getting a return out of (eggs). In short, none of the "reasons to keep a rooster" that I hear voiced are things that I find to be true or applicable to my situation. For me, the only actual value of a rooster over a hen in the flock (based on my own personal experience) is fertility.
     
  3. Devon07

    Devon07 Chirping

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    Jun 6, 2014
    Understand that. I had to get rid of a cockerel because my roo and him were starting to clash....I hated to do it because so many disgard roosters but I had one already and he was the one who best fit my scenario. This is another reason I want to learn more about this....where do all the roosters end up? im sure many hit the ole crock pot (as did mine) but if you visit the meat bird section you learn real quick not many can easily do that.


    I did notice (with mine) when I locked up my roo and cockerel to keep them from fighting, the girls drifted about three times the distance away from where they now stay with my roo keeping them closer to the coop. Maybe with no roo around they are a little more observant, I feel like mine would be 10 miles away if me or the roo werent watching.


    :)
     
    Last edited: Jul 31, 2014
  4. Mccluckers

    Mccluckers Chirping

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    uk
    Yes I have a roo his name is stan and I love him he his so brave and protective of the girls [​IMG]

    Lov'em
     
  5. Devon07

    Devon07 Chirping

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    Jun 6, 2014
    Good lookin rooster! make sure you vote in the poll. Thanks!
     
  6. lazy gardener

    lazy gardener Crossing the Road 5 Years

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    CENTRAL MAINE zone 4B
    Voted. My EE roo gets to stay with his harem of 17 girls... for now. Yes, the crowing is bothersome, but as the days get shorter his wake up call is getting closer to our wake up time, so hoping it will eventually balance out. He's 17 weeks old, and getting better at taking care of his girls every day. He's just started sharing tidbits. He makes little nests around the yard, inviting the girls to put an egg in his creation. Thankfully, no takers there! He runs out to meet my car when I get home to be sure i'm not an intruder. If a hen makes a distress call, he comes on the run to be sure all is well. So far, he's people friendly. BUT, if that changes, I'll sadly cull him. He should make some awesome chicks in the spring.
     
  7. Devon07

    Devon07 Chirping

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    Jun 6, 2014
    Thanks Lazy!...Im trying to figure out how so many mention them being loud....I know if you are in town and the roo is close to the house that it possibly can be loud but honestly I am missing something, I can not hear my roo and he is within 20ft of my bedroom window, Even if I tried and did hear him im not sure it would wake me....today he is on his third series of crowing episodes....first was at 9am then 11:30 then at 2:20 and he will more than likely have one more around 5pm and thats it....Ive been out most of the day and kept track of it....he is really quiet....maybe mine is broken! lol

    My roo isnt friendly ....he just exsist and does his thing...we dont try and pet him or do anything with him....we may toss him some treats here and there but thats it, the girls are petted and hand fed etc.

    :)
     
    Last edited: Jul 31, 2014
  8. Peeps61

    Peeps61 Songster

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    Apr 19, 2014
    NW Florida
    I do not have a rooster. I won't actively seek one out, but if I end up with one in my supposedly female group of chicks, I'll certainly keep him. I am allowed roosters where I live and did have one before he was killed by a predator in late May. I had a love/hate relationship with this rooster, but he was pretty good to the girls, so I put up with more than I normally would have from an animal I was paying to upkeep.
     
  9. Ilovefarming

    Ilovefarming Chirping

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    I would give anything to have a roo! But my neighbors would hate me..... [​IMG]
     
  10. Mrs. K

    Mrs. K Crowing 8 Years

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    western South Dakota
    I think that one needs to go into a rooster relationship with a sharp knife. Some roosters work, and work very well. Some are nightmares in the making. If you go into having a roo, like a commitment, then you might be disappointed. Too many people go into having a rooster with the idea, if they do everything exactly right, they will have a great rooster. Then if he is a bad one, they feel guilty, and put up with terrible behavior way too long, trying all sorts of things to keep him, risking attack themselves or for someone else.

    If one goes into the whole thing, with the attitude that this might work, and if it doesn't, I can take care of it. I can cull a bad rooster, to make room for a good rooster, it works better. A flock with a good rooster or even two, is a good thing.

    One must remember, roosters are not people, they have a very small brain, they don't reason real well, and some WILL bite the hands that feed them. Some are good for the flock and some are not. If you cannot cull a bird, then don't get a rooster

    Mrs K
     
    Last edited: Aug 1, 2014

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