Does anyone know how to cook soap root?

Discussion in 'Random Ramblings' started by WooingWyandotte, Jan 11, 2012.

  1. WooingWyandotte

    WooingWyandotte Overrun With Chickens

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    We've founds some soap root and want to cook it, and eat it. I've searched all over Google and there is no recipes. Has anyone done it? Do you have any recipes for it?
     
  2. CluckyJay

    CluckyJay Chillin' With My Peeps

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    What is the Latin name?
     
  3. WooingWyandotte

    WooingWyandotte Overrun With Chickens

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    Chlorogalum pomeridianum
     
  4. CluckyJay

    CluckyJay Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I didn't find a way to eat it though.
     
  5. CluckyJay

    CluckyJay Chillin' With My Peeps

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  6. CluckyJay

    CluckyJay Chillin' With My Peeps

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    "OTHER USES:
    Soap plant was traditionally used by several California Native American tribes and early settlers. Tribes included but were not limited to the Miwok, Hulpumne Yokuts, and Wailakis [1,2,11,44]. Chlorogalum spp. are among the prominent genera gathered for their edible underground parts [1]. The bulb can be boiled to take out the soapy material and then eaten like a potato. The young shoots, when thoroughly roasted, are said to as "sweet as sugar" [11,58]. The Hulpumne Yokuts said soap plant was the "food that most abounds" [1]. Soap plant was used as emergency food during lean acorn years [1]. The value of Chlorogalum spp. was high for the Miwok. Highly sought for food and its medicinal use, soap plant was one of the most versatile plants in the Miwok economy [44]."
     
  7. WooingWyandotte

    WooingWyandotte Overrun With Chickens

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    Wow! Thank you for all the research you did; I didn't think anyone would really research it, but thank you very much!
    The part in bold type is especially interesting, for we used different sizes when we tried cooking it. We experimented with several different ways of cooking it. We wrapped one in foil and let it roast over the fire overnight, it turned into a piece of soap root charcoal. [​IMG]Then we tried wrapping it in foil and baking it for about an hour and ten minutes, those ones turned out fine. I tried boiling them to get the "soapy" stuff out, which took an hour. We made a "test one", we added baking soda, corn starch, thyme, ginger....etc. We cooked it for 35 minutes at 350 degrees Fahrenheit. It smelled delicious, but when we tasted it we all nearly threw up. [​IMG] All that work, and a disgusting result. Well, we learned, I guess, so at least that wasn't wasted. We adjusted the recipe and did a few things different. So we popped it in the oven. Awhile later I took it out it smelled very yummy; when it was time to eat it I put a piece in my mouth and smiled. Yes! It was perfect, delicious, so utterly won - I stopped. A new, ravenous, bitter taste had taken over my tongue, coating my tonsils, throat, and roof of my mouth. It was so bitter, that I almost cried, but if spat it out, people would've seen me spit it out and not eaten it. So I swallowed the hellish mixture down my poor throat without a peep.
    So, it wasn't sweet as sugar, but I'm wondering if we put too much baking soda in, or if we should just use small ones. Blegh. I wrote the recipe down, let me see if I can post it.
     

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