Does chicken netting rust?

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by Codyandme1, Sep 4, 2011.

  1. Codyandme1

    Codyandme1 Out Of The Brooder

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    May 24, 2011
    There is many varieties of wire available but do you have to use chicken because it doesn't rust.. Or does chicken wire rust after awhile anyway?
     
  2. hcppam

    hcppam Chillin' With My Peeps

    it will all rust under certain circumstances. I like hardware cloth the best but it's $$. [​IMG]
     
  3. citychickx6

    citychickx6 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Chicken wire is not very sturdy. It will rust given the right conditions.
    I prefer hardware cloth as well but then there is the $$$ involved.
    I myself went with 2x4 welded wire from the farm supply store. A 6ft tall roll of 100ft long was 110 dollars. I know many predators can still get through it (luckily we are only dealing with hawks, raccoons, and foxes here).
    I did put chicken wire on the lower 2ft of the fence and 12in folded outward at the bottom to help discourage diggers from getting in.
    Many people have used chain link with great success as well.
    Happy fencing whichever you choose.
     
  4. pawsplus

    pawsplus Chillin' With My Peeps

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    The best thing to use is heavy-gauge WOVEN (not welded) wire. I have a number of digging barriers in my dogs' yard b/c my little dog Sam (25 lbs) is a serious recreational digger. He has DESTROYED even heavy-gauge welded wire. If I lay down WOVEN wire, though (either 2x4 horse fence or 2x2 woven wire from Lowe's), that stops him. Hence, that's what I now use as digging aprons on my runs.

    My runs are chainlink, but if I didn't have them and were starting from scratch I would use either horse fence or the 2x2 woven wire (with hardware cloth on the bottom 2 feet to prevent 'coon grabs). Chicken wire is a complete misnomer and to be avoided at all costs!
     
  5. elmo

    elmo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:Are you comparing the same gauge woven wire with the same gauge welded wire? I find it hard to believe that the same gauge product woven is stronger than the same gauge welded. The welding of the intersecting wires provides a structural strength that just weaving the wires together can't provide.

    The product sold as chicken wire (in addition to the structural weakness of woven wire) is also usually a very high gauge (20 or higher). That's very weak stuff.
     
  6. elmo

    elmo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:Wire for fence is usually galvanized (coated with zinc) to inhibit rust. But over time the zinc wears off and the wire does rust.
     
  7. lovinlife

    lovinlife Chillin' With My Peeps

    Quote:Are you comparing the same gauge woven wire with the same gauge welded wire? I find it hard to believe that the same gauge product woven is stronger than the same gauge welded. The welding of the intersecting wires provides a structural strength that just weaving the wires together can't provide.

    The product sold as chicken wire (in addition to the structural weakness of woven wire) is also usually a very high gauge (20 or higher). That's very weak stuff.

    It's actually a twisted wire, not just woven. It's typically sold as "no climb horse fence" and is much stronger than welded wire, even the heavy gauge. The welds usually pop over time if the fence is bent or tested at all. The no climb fence usually costs 75% more than the welded wire. It's very sturdy and has to be pulled with a tractor or a fence pulling device in order to be straightened out.

    My dogs have also torn up the welded 2x4 fencing. They can't tear up the twisted no climb wire at all.
     

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