Does putting eggs in the fridge cancel out their fertility?

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by bkymnro, Oct 21, 2008.

  1. Tuffoldhen

    Tuffoldhen Flock Mistress

    7,505
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    Jan 30, 2007
    WV
    Let me say this, it was never intended for refridged eggs to be used as hatching eggs for incubation at my house. Always store eggs to be use for incubation in a cool dry place for up to 10 days if your incubating. The ones from my fridge used were extras that someone wanted and tried just to see if they would hatch out and they did have a hatch. I certainly don't use this method on my hatching of chicks. [​IMG]
     
  2. lnm03

    lnm03 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Oct 6, 2008
    Can you eat a fertalized egg?
     
  3. the1much

    the1much Currently Birdless Hippy

    Quote:yup
     
  4. the1much

    the1much Currently Birdless Hippy

    a fertile egg is 1 or 2 cells different from an un-fertile 1.
     
  5. cjeanean

    cjeanean Can't Decide

    Mar 5, 2008
    Missouri
    I think the OP wants to know if it can be done...I know I threw some of my eggs in the fridge and wanted to hatch them as an afterthought....They've been in there for quite a while, though, so I don't know if they're any good. I was gonna hatch my own but my hens stopped laying, and now my younger hens are giving me pullet eggs but the roos won't do their business....
     
  6. joebryant

    joebryant Overrun With Chickens

    I'd have an impossible chance of finding a place anywhere around here that's 55 degrees to store eggs. Could they be kept in a cooler with some ice added? I doubt that that would be as cold as a refrigerator and cooler than anywhere in my house.

    EDIT: Found this:
    http://www.cd3wd.com/cd3wd_40/vita/foodproc/en/foodproc.htm
    "Potatoes keep better if cured within 1-3 days after harvest. The easiest way to
    cure potatoes is to keep them in a container with restricted ventilation (to
    establish a high relative humidity of about 85 percent)
    for about 15 days at 15 [degrees]C
    (60[degrees]F), or 10 days to 20[degrees]F, or 6 days at 25[degrees]F). After curing, fully
    open the container to allow free air movement and store in a cool, dark place."

    Edit #2: Is that humidity too high?
     
    Last edited: Oct 29, 2008
  7. the1much

    the1much Currently Birdless Hippy

    i put all my eggs in a small fridge set to its warmest setting, and after a week i let them sit out for about 8 hours to get room temp,, then in the bator they go,, we have 30 in the bator i put in there last week, they were in the fridge for a week, and EVERY 1 of them are developing.
     
  8. joebryant

    joebryant Overrun With Chickens

    Quote:Do you know what the humidity in your small fridge is when it's set to its warmest, or does humidity matter when they're being stored?
     
  9. the1much

    the1much Currently Birdless Hippy

    Quote:Do you know what the humidity in your small fridge is when it's set to its warmest, or does humidity matter when they're being stored?

    nope never checked it, but i got them in cartons, and unless it was extremely high i dont think,,THINK,, it matters,, when it gets too high it would probably drown them. and my house is WICKED dry here,, shoot with no water in the bator, it goes down to 25% instantly , and if let alone, even lower.
     
  10. joebryant

    joebryant Overrun With Chickens

    I think that I've found a good place in my house to store my hopefully-soon-to-come eggs waiting to go into the incubator. I put a thermomter that measure temperature and humidity in a cabinet downstairs in the utility room. It measured 66 degrees and 46% humidity. Does that sound good?
     
    Last edited: Oct 29, 2008

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