Dog attacked chicken

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by cowgirlchicken, Sep 19, 2014.

  1. cowgirlchicken

    cowgirlchicken Out Of The Brooder

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    May 27, 2014
    Michigan
    My dog got out of the fence yesterday and got one of my chickens... She has a pretty deep wound but she will live I believe if it doesn't get infected and nasty. She hurt her leg or foot I imagine it's broke and she has her foot curled up and today I noticed it has gone black. What's the best medicine to use on this deep wound and what should I do about her foot? Do you think it would just be best to kill her and take her out of her misery? Please help this is my first year with chickens. I also have her in a dog cage with shavings to keep her from getting dirty and as of now I just put bag balm in the wound to keep dirt from entering! Please help! [​IMG]
     
  2. cowgirlchicken

    cowgirlchicken Out Of The Brooder

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    May 27, 2014
    Michigan
    No replies really? Thank you byc :/
     
  3. Fly Right

    Fly Right Out Of The Brooder

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    Jul 26, 2014
    Sorry I can't help you about the leg, maybe someone will chime in soon. But for the wound I have a little experience. My dog attacked my chicken a few weeks ago. She survived. I would fill the wound up with neosporin (without pain relief) everyday for about 10 days until I could see it healing. Her feathers grew back in and she looks great. You are doing a good job. Just keep it clean and check it daily for infection. It will start to stink if it's getting infected. Good luck. Don't give up on her just yet. She is probably still in shock so keep her separated and quiet.
     
  4. cowgirlchicken

    cowgirlchicken Out Of The Brooder

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    May 27, 2014
    Michigan
    Thank you so much fly right! How should I clean her wound? I'm sure she prolly doesn't want a bath lol but that's the only thing I can think of
     
  5. cafarmgirl

    cafarmgirl Overrun With Chickens

    You don't need to bath her, she doesn't need the added stress. You do need to flush the wound well, betadine would be a good choice, you can use a weak peroxide solution but only use it once as it can retard healing if used over and over. Once you've flushed out the wound cover what you can with Neosporin and leave her in a quiet place to rest as shock can be a problem. Make sure she has food/water available of course. Antibiotic's would most likely be a good idea but I'm not sure which one would be best for this, hopefully someone else can make a suggestion. I've used Baytril 10% in the past with good results but you have to order it on line.

    Edited to add: I'm not sure there's much you can do about the foot. Watch her for a couple days and see if there's any improvement. If it's turning dark it could be that circulation is cut off but it could also be bruising.
     
    Last edited: Sep 20, 2014
  6. cowgirlchicken

    cowgirlchicken Out Of The Brooder

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    May 27, 2014
    Michigan
    Thank you so much I have her in a dog cage with shavings in my pole barn and it's pretty mellow just people in and out but she likes people. Has been eating and drinking and laid an egg today I don't know if that's a good sign or if it's just something she'd continue to do.. Would saline work just as well? I thought about peroxide and know to use it just onse. And yes I am going to look I to antibiotics right now thank you!!! I think I over reacted with her foot it's super warm though but so is her other which is nerve racking because I know that means infection. I straighten it out and make her set it down because I don't want it to stick like that or anything and figured it's good for circulation
     
  7. Fly Right

    Fly Right Out Of The Brooder

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    Jul 26, 2014
    Sounds like you're doing a good job. Being super warm may not be a bad thing. Check your other chickens legs, because I have noticed my chickens all have super warm legs and feet. I think that's normal at least for my girls. If she is eating and drinking that is a very good sign. Just keep the wound clean. But I must confess, my girl still wanted her dust baths and she got her wound dirty. Since she was so flighty all I really could do is fill her wound with triple anti-biotic ointment every evening when she went to roost and try and smell it for infection. It worked for me. Keep up the good work.
     

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