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Drafty vs. ventilated

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by columbiacritter, Feb 14, 2009.

  1. columbiacritter

    columbiacritter Chillin' With My Peeps

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    So how do you determine if your coop is toooo ventilated or not enough?

    I have roof vents under the eaves of my coop and I'm not sure if I shouldn't block some up. The windows are caulked tight and the doors have weather stripping.
     
  2. azelgin

    azelgin Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have opening windows on three sides of my coop. One set above and behind the roost, that stay closed until summer and one on each of the walls perpendicular to the roosts, that direct airflow in front of the roost. The pop door is open all the time (it is under one of the end windows, actually it is a door with an opening window in it). I open and close the windows depending on the wind we are having and keep an eye on the glass for condensation. When I see moisture on the window, it's time to open it up. Someone will probably come along here and tell me I am doing it all wrong, but the chickens are happy and warm in the worst of weather and the coop is nice and dry inside along with the feed.
     
    Last edited: Feb 14, 2009
  3. jubylives

    jubylives Chillin' With My Peeps

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  4. patandchickens

    patandchickens Flock Mistress

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    Vents under the eaves of all sides (if I'm understanding your setup) is good.

    What azelgin says about management. In principle, leave it all open. If it starts getting colder than the chickens like, close some of it off (like, the usually-upwind side) but leave as much open as possible.

    If you get condensation on surfaces, or it smells ammonia-y or very 'strong' when you open the door in the morning, you need to be leaving more vents open. (Exception: if you have an uninsulated metal roof, you may get condensation almost no matter what, on cold days; solution is to insulate it)

    If there is no condensation or strong smell in the morning, you probably have adequate ventilation [​IMG]

    Good luck, have fun,

    Pat
     

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