Drake and hens...

Discussion in 'Ducks' started by CandylandRanch, Oct 13, 2014.

  1. CandylandRanch

    CandylandRanch Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sep 6, 2014
    Michigan
    Hi there! This is my first flock and this is something I really need some advice on. I have one rooster, 11 hens, a drake and a female duck. They were all raised together since day one and all bonded so well, we tried to separate the chicks from The ducks when they were young but everyone seemed to be sad so we put them back together and they all snuggled like they missed each other.

    They now are at laying age, I have two hens laying and my girl duck is laying as well. Their coop is a good 200sq ft, tall.. It's an old shed converted. Their run is probably closer to 300sq ft. And with this age, now I notice my drake running after my hens. They usually can get away, but I am worried he's going to hurt them in an irreparable way (I've read how their parts are much larger than a rooster) . I love my hens to pieces and I need to do what's best. My rooster is still young and I was hoping he would put the drake in his place, which for the first time happened just a couple days ago, but is the rooster enough to keep the drake away? If I lock the drake up at night in a dog crate is this enough? If I get rid of my drake won't my duck hen be sad???? If I got another duck for her would that disrupt everyone? Could the drake kill my hens?? Will he stress them out and will this interfere with laying and egg production?

    I really really appreciate all the advice I can get. I need to sort this out ASAP
    Thank you!

    Chelsea
     
  2. Kleonaptra

    Kleonaptra Chillin' With My Peeps

    I hope someone more experienced chimes in here for you cos I am kinda in the same boat. It sounds like you know your little family well and you might just need time to decide what to do.

    Locking up the drake at night may help, but once it gets dark they usually all sleep so this is a less likely time for him to do damage. (Ive considered locking up my boys at night but there doesnt seem much point since they all just sleep)

    If you get rid of the drake, the girl duck may be a bit lonely. Yes introducing a new duck usually throws the flock for a loop, but they get over it.

    He could stress them out and it may affect egg production, but the rooster should be on that. If they all grew up together they might work it out.

    I have heard that yes, drakes can kill chickens by mating with them or attempting to. So what breed of duck and what breed of chicken? I have 3 drakes, one is a sweetie that never mates anyone (mores the pity) and I have 2 call drakes and their mother who is for unknown reasons ACTING like a drake.

    Those 3 quite happily tackle my isa brown chicken. She sometimes allows it and other times beats them up. Shes bigger than them but not by much. My australorp chicken however, takes them to town if they even look at her sideways. Shes a good 3 times larger than them with very powerful claws! I only have the 2 hens, no rooster.

    Im sad thinking I might have to get rid of a drake. It wouldnt be so bad if their mother wasnt bent on acting like one too! It is quite hilarious watching the three little calls bring down a big pekin to mate her but, I think for my pekin girls its getting beyond a joke!
     
  3. CandylandRanch

    CandylandRanch Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sep 6, 2014
    Michigan
    I have 5 EE hens and 6 buff Orpington hens, the ducks are pekin., and now to think about it they might be jumbo, not sure but they are big .. [​IMG]

    I would prefer to find a way to keep my drake, but I won't hesitate if it's going to be detrimental to my ladies..

    Ahh... The issues that come from loving chickens.. lol
     
  4. needlessjunk

    needlessjunk Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 19, 2014
    Round Rock, TX
    Jumbo Pekins can get quite large and I imagine will do damage. What about just get 2 more female ducks? It wi give him more females and he should then leave the chickens alone.
     

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