Drake attacked his ducklings!

Cazook

Songster
Nov 24, 2019
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there was some chew. Less than I expected, but not none. While the stock cooked down, the breasts were seasoned and rested in the fridge for several dies. Once the soup was otherwise ready, the breasts were diced small (not "fine", but not "hearty beef stew-sized cubes, either), added to the just simmering soup, and allowed to cook for a few hours.

Long aging helped. The fact that they didn't face boiling temps helped. The sheer amount of cream probably helps with mouthfeel as well.

Mostly, I was surprised myself. But if you take old bird and subject it to high dry heat, it squeezes moisture out you can never replace, and if it doesn't get an adequate rest, of course those proteins will never relax.

Truly though, we got lucky.

i rested mine for 2 days before roasting. he was over a year old though, and a runner duck, which i hear can get quite tough.

probably roasting first wasn't the way to go, there was almost nothing on the breast. most meat was in the legs. maybe better off getting a different breed for next time.
 

U_Stormcrow

Free Ranging
Jun 7, 2020
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North FL Panhandle Region / Wiregrass
Roasting first (I hate hijacking the thread here, this isn't a cooking forum) is exactly backwards. Look up "reverse sear".

There's a reason that classic dishes made with subpar cuts of meat - like pork carnitas - are made by slow stewing the meat at low temp until tender, and then being taken to a hot flat top or griddle to crisp up, instead of being cooked at high dry heat, then simmered till tender. Or why the local restaurant doesn't first sear the prime rib, then cook it to juicy perfection.
 

Cazook

Songster
Nov 24, 2019
619
976
201
Roasting first (I hate hijacking the thread here, this isn't a cooking forum) is exactly backwards. Look up "reverse sear".

There's a reason that classic dishes made with subpar cuts of meat - like pork carnitas - are made by slow stewing the meat at low temp until tender, and then being taken to a hot flat top or griddle to crisp up, instead of being cooked at high dry heat, then simmered till tender. Or why the local restaurant doesn't first sear the prime rib, then cook it to juicy perfection.

thanks for the advice! but yeah probably shouldn't hijack the thread <_<
 

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