Easiest way to dispatch muscovy

Discussion in 'Meat Birds ETC' started by jdywntr, Oct 5, 2011.

  1. jdywntr

    jdywntr Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Okay. I got 5 Muscovy ducklings a while back hoping for several females. I ended up with at least 3 males, 1 female for sure and 1 I'm not 100% sure about because it is in between the size of the girl and the boys.

    My reason for getting muscovy was to be more self sufficient. I would like to be able to produce as much of my own food as possible (until I talk (AKA force) DH into moving) I live in the suburbs and they are quiet, lay well and are usually good moms.

    I have never slaughtered a bird but I think that I can do it. ( I used to work for the SPCA and had to put animals to sleep so while this is not an injection, I think I can deal with the process)

    I was hoping to find someone near me that I could get some experience with before having to do this for the first time but the time is approaching (I don't want my 1 for sure girl to be injured by multiple males) and I have not found anyone.

    I have read what amount to horror stories of inexperienced people trying to slit throats. I don't want to cause undo suffering.

    So, what would be the easiest method?

    Opinions from those who have been there would be appreciated. I would prefer a no fault type of method.

    Thanks.
     
  2. runsw/scissors

    runsw/scissors Chillin' With My Peeps

    There are almost as many methods as people doing the deed. For myself I preferred the ax method. It was quick and 100% fatal.

    Hopefully others will jump in and help you out.
     
  3. jdywntr

    jdywntr Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:Thanks. I'm hoping for more opinions too.
     
  4. FarmerRob

    FarmerRob Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I suggest a killing cone mounted to an outside barn wall or to a tree.

    You can get a good deal on one from e-bay--they are MUCH more expensive from the poultry supply companies/hatcheries.

    http://www.ebay.com/itm/Large-Chick...644?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item19c91f1844

    With a cone you can put your birds in it and it will restrain their behavior and actually calm them down. Then when you slaughter, have a bucket waiting underneath to let them bleed out. They will stay in the cone and you will not have them running all over the yard without a head. This is the best way IMHO to process any poultry.
     
  5. Oregon Blues

    Oregon Blues Overrun With Chickens

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    I've got a stump with 2 nails in it. The nails are the right distance apart so that the neck fits and the head won't slid between them.

    The bird's neck is placed between the nails and then straightened out. A sharp hatchet is used to chop the head off. Then the bird is hung by the feet to bleed out.

    The bird is absolutely dead for sure. It bleeds out well, and it is extremely quick.

    You must chop really hard and not be tentative about it. Swing like you plan to bury that hatchet deep in the stump.
     
  6. jdywntr

    jdywntr Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:This may be a dumb question but do you do this alone or with a helper?
     
  7. jdywntr

    jdywntr Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Also, if you use an axe, is it just a regular axe like from Home Depot? Long handled I would think would be best, more swing.
     
  8. Oregon Blues

    Oregon Blues Overrun With Chickens

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    Chopping heads is a one person job. If you want to use a long handled ax, it becomes a 2 person job: one to hold the bird and one to swing the ax.

    With a hatchet, you place the bird's neck between the nails and straighten it out. One hand holds the bird's body and the other hand chops with the hatchet.

    Because the head is held in place by the nails and your hand is down at the duck's body, your hand is well clear of where the hatchet will strike. The majority of the birds do not struggle once their head and neck are in place. Again, you want to use a sharp hatchet and swing like you really mean it.

    It's possible to handle them gently and it doesn't seem to frighten them to have their neck on the chopping block. They don't understand the concept of an ax, so one second they are not too terrible upset and the next micro-second, they are dead. There is no fear happening.

    My ducks don't particularly like to be carried around, but they aren't afraid of me, so other than complaining about being carried, they are not frightened. All butchering is done well out of the sight of the flock and no bird is carried to the dispatch area until it is his turn. I don't know if it upsets them to watch, and I don't intend to find out.
     
  9. jdywntr

    jdywntr Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thank you Oregon Blues. You eazed my mind on some issues I had not even thought about. I appreciate your input. [​IMG]
     

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