Egg-bound chicken?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Georgiachick18, Oct 17, 2018.

  1. Wyorp Rock

    Wyorp Rock Enabler

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    I am no expert on doing a necrospy.
    Surprisingly it is not too difficult if you are going to look in the abdomen and at the organs. The skin is quite thin, just like store bought chicken, it may be easier if you cover the head so you don't see the face.
    With reproductive problems usually you will see that pretty obviously. Fluid, egg matter, sometimes an egg, etc. may actually be in the body cavity. Ovaries may be cancerous, etc.
    If you do still have the body and want to try, take some photos we will take a look with you and give you our opinion.

    Something I don't know if you have seen/read is the necropsy thread, it hasn't been active in a few months, but there are photos from BYC members and discussion of what is seen, you may find that helpful as well. The last 5 pages of that thread, if I remember correctly, most deal with reproductive problems. https://www.backyardchickens.com/th...ntains-graphic-necropsy-photos.823961/page-35

    Again, I'm so sorry about Rosie.

    Here's one necropsy manual.
    https://vet.uga.edu/oldvpp/programs/afvet/attachments/how_to_necropsy_a_bird.pdf
     
  2. Georgiachick18

    Georgiachick18 In the Brooder

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    Do you usually use a razor blade or how do you make the incision? Any danger of anything contagious? We are going to, of course, have on gloves but any other advice? I think we’re going try to do this.
     
  3. Wyorp Rock

    Wyorp Rock Enabler

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    You can use a razor blade, sharp kitchen knife, kitchen shears or scalpel.
    I don't worry about anything contagious, but do wear gloves. If you are worried, you can always wear a mask as well.

    Just go slow, if you are starting at the abdomen, when you part the feathers you will find that the skin is thin just like in a store bought chicken so it's very easy to cut, I usually make a very shallow incision, then work/pull the skin apart to the sides. The only thing I worry about cutting into too early is intestines since that can put fluids into the body cavity and make it more of a mess to see what's going on, if you work slow and careful that won't be a problem.

    You've got this!!
     
  4. Georgiachick18

    Georgiachick18 In the Brooder

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    Thank you the guidance!

    My daughter and I made an effort. We didn’t get too far but I’m hoping we were able to determine enough that you can look at this photo and give us your thoughts. (I’m sure you and others look at these types of sights but ‘GRAPHIC’ warning on the photo nonetheless.)

    I had noticed that Rosie had a hard area on what I believe was the right side of her abdomen. I had thought before that possibly it was a lodged egg.

    When we cut into her abdomen we found what appeared to be a hard tumor? Again, I have no knowledge of a chicken’s anatomy so it may not be what it appears. There was also a lot of fluid but perhaps that could’ve built up since we did not do the necropsy until the next day.

    This being our first effort we weren’t able to do anymore; we had to stop. (Big kudos to my 15-year old daughter who I now believe may have a career in medicine!) I am so hoping this photo will give you some insight. This experience has made me realize how much I need to learn about a chicken’s anatomy. I thought I knew quite a bit about raising backyard chickens. Now, I know that there is SO much more to learn especially when they begin to have failing health. Thank you and fingers crossed that this one photo can shed some light.
     

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  5. Wyorp Rock

    Wyorp Rock Enabler

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    I'm sure it was very hard to do this, so good for you! Thumbsup to your daughter for helping:)

    It can be a bit intimidating, but you did very well. We love our girls and never think that we may have to do this.
    I agree, there is so much to learn about how a chicken works! I don't understand it all, but I find it very interesting and learn something new all the time. Do some google searches especially looking at extension articles or Merck Vet manual sites, those have very good information on anatomy.
    It's good that your daughter could help you, you never know, this may have just sparked an interest into an exciting and rewarding career!

    Did you happen to peel back that skin a little? From what I can see, I suspect that your girl had Salpingitis.
    I would expect some fluid in the abdomen with a mass, so I think that was probably there before death.
    This is what I "think" you may have been seeing and feeling - the link has GRAPHIC PHOTOS
    https://www.backyardchickens.com/th...r-crop-euthanize.1207070/page-2#post-19167324
     
  6. Georgiachick18

    Georgiachick18 In the Brooder

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    Excellent information/resources and thank you for your kind comments and support! We did not peel the skin back, because we thought we were looking at a solid mass —as we cut into it slightly. I see what you’re saying (by looking at the link you shared) that there could’ve been an egg inside of that. Valuable lesson learned there. I suppose what we can say with certainty is that there was either an egg stuck (due to the condition we suspect) or a mass that had developed —most likely cancer? I wanted to see what was causing her discomfort and know with certainty that she was not going to survive it. Of course, she went down as soon as we gave her the calcium/Epsom salt bath. I’m assuming she was much weaker than she had been the times we had given it to her before— as it had caused her to bounce back, previously. And in the end, it actually served as a way to end her suffering. I am praying those last 24 hours we’re not terribly painful. Of course, I’ll never know but I do know that it ended what would’ve been probably weeks of continued suffering.
     
  7. Wyorp Rock

    Wyorp Rock Enabler

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    I think you were looking at a solid mass. It could have been cancer or a large amount of "coagulated exude" (salpingitis) or similar. Sometimes an egg or egg matter can drop into the abdomen and then it gets "wrapped" with layers of, for lack of better word, pus.
    The body is trying to isolate it, so it continues to "grow", this eventually causes the organs to shut down.

    That was not survivable. That is something you should know. You did everything you could for her and made her comfortable.
     
  8. Georgiachick18

    Georgiachick18 In the Brooder

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    Thank you for telling me that and giving me that final word of comfort. Means so much. I’m sure it’s obvious how much I struggled with this: grasping for information as I was needing to make decisions. You have really been a lifeline.

    Along with Rosie our two (older) cats became ill and we had to put them both down in the last two weeks— so it’s been tough around our place on the animal-front.

    After this experience, I’ll at least be more astute with regards to these types of abdominal/reproductive issues. All you can do is do your best to become knowledgeable from these kinds of losses.
     
    Cragg Klefor and Wyorp Rock like this.
  9. Wyorp Rock

    Wyorp Rock Enabler

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    :hugs You are so sweet. I'm so sorry to hear about your cats too. My goodness you have had a rough time of it.

    I too struggle, even though I have had several to put down, each time it's a bit different, but I do learn something along the way. I suppose that's how life is, we have to take some bad to really appreciate the good times.

    I wish you all the best.
     
    Georgiachick18 likes this.
  10. Georgiachick18

    Georgiachick18 In the Brooder

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    Thank you and I wish you the best as well! I will be following you and others to learn as much as I can. This looks like a really incredible community of support. I’m so glad I found it. I’m sure I will have more challenges and questions ahead but hopefully not in the near future. Take care!
     

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