Egg bound, parasite,,,Not sure please help

KIMEng

Chirping
Jul 4, 2019
71
85
81
Orlando, Fl
Hello,this group has been so helpful in the past I'm sending this out to you to help me figure out what is going on with my Silver Lace Wyanddote, known as Sue Ellen. She started laying eggs at about 16 wks , about 3-4 smallish eggs a week, now 24 weeks old. Egg laying pattern about the same until last week. She has stopped laying for about 4-5 days now. She has always had a bit of an messy bottom but it has gotten a some worse over the last few days-wk and I'm not sure if this is contributing to her problem. She is a bit of an indifferent girl, not overly friendly but not a chicken that avoids us either. She is the largest of 3 laying pullets but not the alpha. Anyway she has stopped laying, her behavior seems much the same eating, drinking, making chicken noises when we come up to the coop.
Other mitigating factors:
1) We have just started putting the girls back into the coop overnight, about a week now, they have been brought in at night to our back porch Lanai for about 2-3 months after a predator took one of the flock and we have been building a new secure coop. She layed 2-3 eggs and then stopped.
2) We are integrating our 4- 12 wk pullets into this flock which occurred quicker than we expected when the 12 wks olds got out of the internal pen in the coop and managed to begin the mingling themselves. This is going OK, she does not seem to chase after the new flock as much as the other 2
3) Yes I have changed up the food a bit, mixing all flock with laying pellets with the 12 wk olds now in the coop its next to impossible to keep the 12wk olds out of the laying pellets with out sequestering them again-they get oyster shell with their food Dried grub or crickets snacks about 2 times a week and veggies/fruit of the day about 2-3 times a week
4) She is an afternoon layer, and lays the egg anywhere she darn well pleases except in the laying bins in the coop house-so we go on a search and rescue mission to find the egg every time she lays and typically her egg is not as dense as the barred rock or Red Sex links

She is just one of those birds that do not seem to be stressed out, however she did not get the name Sue Ellen by accident, a bit of an instigator when she was a younger chick.

So no eggs for 4-5 days, her bottom looks messy to me (pics attached), I do not feel an egg in her abdomen and she does not fuss when I palpate, in fact she is very cooperative with this examination and I think she is ready for a Roo when i do this :eek:I do not see her straining but I'm not out there all day So there is a new routine and new family members in the coop-can all this be causing her issues? The other 2 laying pullets have not missed a beat on egg laying routine.

Oh we also have a hurricane potentially coming our way...not sure if she is sensing that:barnie

Pics regarding her bottom (yes that's her poop below the bottom pic):
IMG_3264.jpg IMG_3257.jpg IMG_3250.jpg IMG_3258.jpg IMG_3253.jpg IMG_3262.jpg IMG_3256.jpg IMG_3248.jpg
Please help
Kim
 

DobieLover

Easily distracted by chickens
Premium Feather Member
Jul 23, 2018
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NY Southern Tier
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Hi, Kim,

I would start by cleaning up her backside by soaking her in some warm, mildly soapy water and squeezing/crushing the dried poop off her feathers until she is clean. Give her a rinse then towel dry and she should be good.
I would say that with her behavior being normal, the move to the new coop as well as the introduction of the younger pullets and the mild feed change, she is stressed enough to have stopped laying.
I would not mix layer feed in with All Flock. I'm not sure if I read correctly, but don't mix oyster shell in with the food. Offer it in a separate container very near the feed. (Sorry if I misinterpreted what you wrote if you are already feeding OS this way).
I personally much prefer to feed an All Flock type ration as it offers a better level of protein and a calcium level that is appropriate for non-laying birds. The active layers are supported by the oyster shell.
Another potential cause of diarrhea and egg production decrease can be a higher than normal worm load. You may also wish to get a fecal float done.
Do your other girls use the "laying bins"? Where are they located in the coop? How private are they? How are they bedded down? Do you have fake eggs or golf balls in the nests? Some pullets/hens are pickier than others.
 

Ebony Rose

Crowing
12 Years
May 26, 2009
2,500
5,644
471
David, Chiriquí, Panama
Getting that poop cleaned up as soon as possible is imperative, don't need to add fly strike to her woes. Did you gently insert a lubed and gloved finger into her vent about an inch or so to feel for an obstruction (egg)?
Should you discover that she's egg bound, a warm bath for 15-20 minutes, lubrication both inside and out of her vent, and a calcium supplement (I use hard boiled or scrambled egg with the shell) should all help her pass the egg. The calcium aids her by strengthening her contractions.
I Agree with DobieLover regarding the small stressors adding up to a potentially stressed and unsure hen, possibly throwing her off-lay. I also agree that worms or coccidiosis could be an additional stressor. Coccidiosis is treated with Corid (TM) (amprolium) and is not the same as treating for worms. Coccidia is present EVERYWHERE, so if she's stressed out or has an underlying illness or disease, it could easily overwhelm her immune system. Treating for coccidiosis, even if she's not suffering from a coccidia overload, will not harm her or your flock in any way, and I recommend this be done at least twice a year, especially if it's been raining or muddy. After treating for coccidiosis, be sure to put vitamin supplements into their water, specifically B-Vitamins.
Worms and their eggs are everywhere too, but require a different type of medicine to treat. A float test sent to or performed by a local vet is suggested, but if you that's not an option, and you suspect worms, then I'd personally err on the side of my flock's health and medicate them. Of the myriad of worms that poultry are susceptible to, most vets prescribe products that contain Fubendazole.
 

KIMEng

Chirping
Jul 4, 2019
71
85
81
Orlando, Fl
Hi, Kim,

I would start by cleaning up her backside by soaking her in some warm, mildly soapy water and squeezing/crushing the dried poop off her feathers until she is clean. Give her a rinse then towel dry and she should be good.
I would say that with her behavior being normal, the move to the new coop as well as the introduction of the younger pullets and the mild feed change, she is stressed enough to have stopped laying.
I would not mix layer feed in with All Flock. I'm not sure if I read correctly, but don't mix oyster shell in with the food. Offer it in a separate container very near the feed. (Sorry if I misinterpreted what you wrote if you are already feeding OS this way).
I personally much prefer to feed an All Flock type ration as it offers a better level of protein and a calcium level that is appropriate for non-laying birds. The active layers are supported by the oyster shell.
Another potential cause of diarrhea and egg production decrease can be a higher than normal worm load. You may also wish to get a fecal float done.
Do your other girls use the "laying bins"? Where are they located in the coop? How private are they? How are they bedded down? Do you have fake eggs or golf balls in the nests? Some pullets/hens are pickier than others.

Thank you for your response! , I new a bath was coming, so I will go forth with that, is dawn dish washing soap acceptable for bathing Chickens?
No, you ready my post right I do mix the oyster shell in with their feed I will go and get a separate feeder container for that.

My other 2 layers a BR and Red Sex link use the bins there are 3 bins in the "Coop house" and they have a separator in between them, so yes private, no problem with them, but they use only 1 of them. Sue Ellen has never used the laying bins. The new girls like to roost outside the "coop house" at night but if they go inside they will sleep in the laying bins and yes of course poop in them, Ugh!

We do have a Vet in the area that sees Chickens, so I think I can get her to do a float test for me to see if she needs to be wormed-what is the most effective way to do this?

So bath first. then try to get a poop sample to the vet- change up feed to all flock and give oyster shell separate-Got it! Thanks again
 

KIMEng

Chirping
Jul 4, 2019
71
85
81
Orlando, Fl
Getting that poop cleaned up as soon as possible is imperative, don't need to add fly strike to her woes. Did you gently insert a lubed and gloved finger into her vent about an inch or so to feel for an obstruction (egg)?
Should you discover that she's egg bound, a warm bath for 15-20 minutes, lubrication both inside and out of her vent, and a calcium supplement (I use hard boiled or scrambled egg with the shell) should all help her pass the egg. The calcium aids her by strengthening her contractions.
I Agree with DobieLover regarding the small stressors adding up to a potentially stressed and unsure hen, possibly throwing her off-lay. I also agree that worms or coccidiosis could be an additional stressor. Coccidiosis is treated with Corid (TM) (amprolium) and is not the same as treating for worms. Coccidia is present EVERYWHERE, so if she's stressed out or has an underlying illness or disease, it could easily overwhelm her immune system. Treating for coccidiosis, even if she's not suffering from a coccidia overload, will not harm her or your flock in any way, and I recommend this be done at least twice a year, especially if it's been raining or muddy. After treating for coccidiosis, be sure to put vitamin supplements into their water, specifically B-Vitamins.
Worms and their eggs are everywhere too, but require a different type of medicine to treat. A float test sent to or performed by a local vet is suggested, but if you that's not an option, and you suspect worms, then I'd personally err on the side of my flock's health and medicate them. Of the myriad of worms that poultry are susceptible to, most vets prescribe products that contain Fubendazole.
Hello and thank you for your response.
So i'm going forth with the bath and then will contact the vet around here that will see chickens to do a float test. I did not insert a finger in her vent, but I can do this, Do I go straight in or at an angle, not sure if she will be very happy about that but she was cooperative with the initial exam I did.
Fl has been super wet this year, I think once I get her float test back hopefully in a couple of days the vet will let me know what the issue is, we do have a potential hurricane bearing down on us, in Orlando, is there something in the mean time I can give her to help her out. I have the probiotics for the water Not sure anyone will be open on Monday with e Holiday and then Tuesday we are going to most like see the effects form this storm.
Would tractor supply have Corid (TM) (amprolium) or Fubendazole or do i need an rx for that?

Thank you again
Kim
 

Ebony Rose

Crowing
12 Years
May 26, 2009
2,500
5,644
471
David, Chiriquí, Panama
I am uncertain what the laws are in Florida for obtaining these medications. You actually want BOTH medications as they treat different parasites. You can administer both of these medications at the same time. Do not offer vitamin supplementation while treating with Corid, offer it AFTER the full treatment has been performed. I'd start her on Corid (and your entire flock) at the earliest convenience. The float test will determine the need for the Fubendazole. I don't know your coop arrangements, but should the hurricane paint a bullseye on your city for point of landing, you may consider bringing your flock into the house; in your bathroom / shower. Laying newspaper on the floor and shower/tub bottom, and old utility toweling in the sink and on the closed toilet lid and toilet basin will offer them safety and comfort. Chickens can fly, but um... I'm sure there's a speed limit :lau
 

KIMEng

Chirping
Jul 4, 2019
71
85
81
Orlando, Fl
I am uncertain what the laws are in Florida for obtaining these medications. You actually want BOTH medications as they treat different parasites. You can administer both of these medications at the same time. Do not offer vitamin supplementation while treating with Corid, offer it AFTER the full treatment has been performed. I'd start her on Corid (and your entire flock) at the earliest convenience. The float test will determine the need for the Fubendazole. I don't know your coop arrangements, but should the hurricane paint a bullseye on your city for point of landing, you may consider bringing your flock into the house; in your bathroom / shower. Laying newspaper on the floor and shower/tub bottom, and old utility toweling in the sink and on the closed toilet lid and toilet basin will offer them safety and comfort. Chickens can fly, but um... I'm sure there's a speed limit :lau
Ok, I'll call tractor supply just see if they have the specific meds and they will pretty much let me know if I have to get an rx for it. I know that TSC has medication-I have seen it in the isle before but never paid attention to what kind. We already have the girls a temp pen set up in the garage for the hurricane, we know we are going to feel some of Dorian's wrath! :hmm
 

DobieLover

Easily distracted by chickens
Premium Feather Member
Jul 23, 2018
33,160
269,735
1,642
NY Southern Tier
My Coop
My Coop
Hello and thank you for your response.
So i'm going forth with the bath and then will contact the vet around here that will see chickens to do a float test. I did not insert a finger in her vent, but I can do this, Do I go straight in or at an angle, not sure if she will be very happy about that but she was cooperative with the initial exam I did.
Fl has been super wet this year, I think once I get her float test back hopefully in a couple of days the vet will let me know what the issue is, we do have a potential hurricane bearing down on us, in Orlando, is there something in the mean time I can give her to help her out. I have the probiotics for the water Not sure anyone will be open on Monday with e Holiday and then Tuesday we are going to most like see the effects form this storm.
Would tractor supply have Corid (TM) (amprolium) or Fubendazole or do i need an rx for that?

Thank you again
Kim
I would hold off on medicating this bird until you have the results of the fecal float back.
Bear in mind that it is normal to find some internal parasite eggs as well as coccidia oocysts in a healthy chicken. You treat when there is an overload of either or outward symptoms. If your pullet is not fluffed up and lethargic, I doubt she has coccidiosis.
She may have an excess load of internal parasites. Roundworms are the most common. If their environment has been wet, the flock may need to be wormed. Again, I'd wait to see what the float results are.
 

KIMEng

Chirping
Jul 4, 2019
71
85
81
Orlando, Fl
Hello, so it took a few days with all the hurricane going ons but we managed to give Sue Ellen a bath today, she did not fuss too much at all, I think she may have actually liked it :celebrate We managed to get a good portion of the poop off and let her soak a bit. I did not get the impression she is doing any excessive straining. She is drying out, I toweled her and then did my best to use a hair dryer too, still drying out. I do not want to put her in the main coop with too much of of her nice pink bottom exposed. there was a big lump of poop, I believe, right at her vent and I got that off without taking any feathers. She was very cooperative. After we put her in the temp pen, she gave me a big poop (see pic) not sure if this is normal? I just fed her a scramble egg with a crushed egg shell and she ate it like no other. Again no problems with her eating and drinking...(pic) acting normal, day 7 with no egg. I may keep her in tonight to get her completely dry. You all have been so helpful and your other suggestions. I'm going to see if I can get her in with the vet for that float test on Friday and check her out if still no egg. I think if she was egg bound she would be worse off, she is acting as normal as can be. What do you think? Thank you !
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KIMEng

Chirping
Jul 4, 2019
71
85
81
Orlando, Fl
So she pooped again after the scrambled egg/egg shell treat and it looks a bit frothy around the edges, I'm wondering if she is just low on calcium (pic) I'm keeping her in tonight and feeding her an egg with shell again in the morning before putting her back in the coop
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