Egg certification.

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by Our Roost, Feb 10, 2013.

  1. Our Roost

    Our Roost Chillin' With My Peeps

    1,102
    130
    188
    Jan 13, 2011
    ScottsVille, michigan
    I have a son who wont eat our freshly layed chicken eggs! He says that unlike store bought eggs, we havent certified whether or not they are fit for human consumption. In reality, I guess he does have a point of concern. Just how "Do" we know if our eggs would pass a USDA certification test? Do they screen out the bad ones or what?
    Is there some kind of light or equipment that they use? If so, is it available to us hobby chicken farmers and locals?
     
  2. Angiebubs

    Angiebubs Chillin' With My Peeps

    2,331
    58
    206
    Aug 19, 2011
    Amery, WI WI/MN border
    http://www.uepcertified.com/about-us.php

    "United Egg Producers (UEP) is a Capper-Volstead cooperative of egg farmers from across the United States representing the ownership of nearly 90 percent of the nation's egg-laying hens. The organization and members have a commitment to house and manage their animals at the highest levels of husbandry and welfare, which is why the UEP Certified program was developed. Launched nationwide in 2002, the UEP Certified program and the resulting seal featured on egg cartons is assurance to customers and foodservice representatives that those eggs originate from farms dedicated to following responsible, science-based farming methods designed to ensure hen welfare."

    Basically, certified eggs means that the animals are being treated fairly. Here is another site with info:
    http://www.humanesociety.org/issues/confinement_farm/facts/guide_egg_labels.html
     
  3. Judy

    Judy Moderator Staff Member

    34,028
    453
    448
    Feb 5, 2009
    South Georgia
  4. chfite

    chfite Chillin' With My Peeps

    2,170
    102
    181
    Jun 7, 2011
    Taylors, SC
    Eggs from the store have safe handling instructions on them that pertain to many raw foods. Eggs produced in a properly clean environment and prepared properly should be safe to eat. This is true whether the eggs came from your coop or from the store.

    We wash our eggs before use. Salmonella is commonly transmitted through inadequate hand-washing and other poor sanitation practices. Salmonella bacteria are common throughout the environment. It becomes a problem when dirty surfaces are left for the bacteria to flourish to become numerous enough to pose a risk for ingestion. People touch the contaminated surfaces and the transfer the bacteria to their mouths and noses when they touch their faces or to other surfaces or food.

    Wash your hands.

    Chris
     
  5. leesbunny

    leesbunny Out Of The Brooder

    63
    5
    33
    Mar 19, 2012
    Timbuctoo
    I would not worry about being "certified" I suppose your son won't eat an apple off a tree at an apple orchard either. People have been eating eggs from chickens for Hundreds of years. Also, many many farmers drink the milk direct from a cow too, without any pasteurization. And lived to talk about it. Way before there was any certification. The eggs from the store are washed--in chemicals. There is no guarantee that any egg you ever eat will not have salmanella. Sorry to sound so tough, but it is people like this that we have government in our business, which in turn adds more chemicals to our food. These thoughts are also the product of our public school system.

    Egg farms only candle the eggs to see if there is an embryo or a crack in the egg. I am going to venture a guess that YOUR farm is cleaner and more sanitary that the farm that any store egg came from. Plus your chickens are healthier, so they will lay healthier eggs.

    I am guessing that the laws for each state are different. In our state (WI) if we want to sell to restaurants and stores, we have to have our Facilities inspected, and to see if we wash the eggs. But they do not inspect every single egg anywhere.

    I very rarely wash any egg that I selI or eat myself. Nature has taken precautions to seal out the dirt from an egg, just in case there is a little chick going to grow in there.

    I would tell my son, that I will eat all my own fresh eggs and he can pay for his from the store then.
     
    1 person likes this.
  6. Our Roost

    Our Roost Chillin' With My Peeps

    1,102
    130
    188
    Jan 13, 2011
    ScottsVille, michigan
    Well dear leesbunny, I have to stick to the rules and guidlines of behavior regarding my answer and response to you or my hands will be slapped and my membership will be in jeapordy. Let me just point out a few issues in relation to your responses. People like my son are not the reasons we have government in our business nor is he responsible for the chemicals in your food. Lets just say he is leary of what he eats and puts into his body. I would be willing to bet you have some of those concerns yourself?
    The question posed was, is there a method of egg certification and or inspection used to process eggs before human consumption. The answer and response is no! Suggesting to me as you did that store eggs are washed -- in chemicals with out data to back it up is alarming in more ways than one.

    Edited by staff
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 13, 2013
  7. howfunkyisurchicken

    howfunkyisurchicken Overrun With Chickens

    9,279
    727
    321
    Apr 11, 2011
    Tn
    Actually, some states require that store bought eggs get a chlorine bath and coating of mineral oil before they can be sold. When they receive their chemical bath, the bloom is removed which allows potential bacteria to enter the egg. It also allows for moisture and carbon dioxide loss, which results in a runny albumen (ever wonder why store eggs whites are inferior to your backyard eggs?)so, they give a coating of mineral oil (or veg oil) to help with this. The USDA requires eggs to be processed within 30 days of when it was laid, 7 for higher quality eggs (organic). Even the organic eggs are required to have this chemical bath. Some commercial producers even wash their eggs in Lye.
    Did you know that chlorine reacts with organic materials to form highly toxic chemicals called DBPs (Disinfection Byproducts http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&sour...z4DIDA&usg=AFQjCNFWKJ30MiIUJol93Z9d8uR0MilT7A ), which can be carcinogenic and mutagenic? Eggs are an organic material, so who knows what kind of chemical reactions are going on inside an egg washed in chlorine....
    Every state has its own laws regarding how eggs are handled, so its difficult to figure out exactly what's being done to your eggs before you get them. There are federal laws that must be followed as well.
    Here's something else: According to the USDA publication "Guidance for Shell Egg Cleansers and Sanitizers"[iv]
    "Compounds used to wash and destain shell eggs are potential food additives. Therefore, they are regulated by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Unfortunately, FDA does not have any published regulations dealing with shell egg cleaning and destaining compounds."
    ...
    The publication goes on to give some guidelines for egg cleaning chemicals, basically instructing farmers to use substances that are "GRAS" (Generally Recognized as Safe), but these substances are not limited in any way.
    http://www.fsis.usda.gov/FACTSheets/Focus_On_Shell_Eggs/index.asp#20
    This link is from the USDA website, stating that you shouldn't wash your store bought eggs because the water can be "sucked" into the eggshell, and that its not necessary for the consumer to do so because they've already been "washed and sanitized" before going to the store. I couldn't get the link for the USDA publication to work (Guidance for Shell Egg Sanitizers and Cleansers EDIT: http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&sour...hoGQCA&usg=AFQjCNFZAjuwCGh9SvCIwf40rt5w_rw_AQ got the link to work-I think ), which is why I quoted it directly.
    So, in my opinion, your backyard eggs are better. They're fresher, contain more nutrients because your birds have access to grass and dirt (this is an assumption on my part, but hey- you're on BYC) and they offer peace of mind that the animals that produced them were treated humanely. Your son certainly isn't the reason government is so involved with our food. We, as a nation, helped them with that when it became acceptable to buy everything with convenience in mind. Just my $0.02.
    Nikki
     
    Last edited: Feb 12, 2013
    1 person likes this.
  8. Our Roost

    Our Roost Chillin' With My Peeps

    1,102
    130
    188
    Jan 13, 2011
    ScottsVille, michigan
    NIKKI !!!!! Good job filling in all the possible blanks in regards to store bought process, state governing rules, and guidlines verses home grown! I explained the protective "bloom" coating of natural protection to my son and the fact that he was definitely getting a better egg than store bought but!, Its a coin toss wether or not he will buy into it and start eating these incredibly delicious eggs. Hes not the first one to come forward with squimish doubts on eating products that dont come from the grocery store.
    I was more worried that I myself was not checking to make sure my eggs were safe to give to friends, family, and customers. Thanks for your input! Very helpful.
     
  9. Angiebubs

    Angiebubs Chillin' With My Peeps

    2,331
    58
    206
    Aug 19, 2011
    Amery, WI WI/MN border
    And I for ne completely understand the concern. When we first started eating eggs-same thing. Its absolutely a new experience when you have a live animal providing food. And as a parent you always want to ensure you are being careful what you give your kids-store bought or home raised. My teenagers had the same issues-ewwww that was just inside that chicken! Now I bet they would think store bought eggs are gross! LOL Kids!
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by