egg layers

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by Gonzo, Jun 12, 2009.

  1. Gonzo

    Gonzo Songster

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    what is the #1 most popular egg laying chicken breed in The United States?[​IMG]
     
  2. halo

    halo Got The Blues

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    My Coop
    I would imagine Leghorns.
     
  3. If you mean for back yard flocks its probably rhode island reds and their hybrids - production reds and red stars (they are a sex link hybrid).

    I would think a close second would be buff o's or astrolorps followed closely by easter eggers.
     
    Last edited: Jun 12, 2009
  4. KittyKelly

    KittyKelly Songster

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    I would say EE's are pretty common. Everybody loves the pretty eggs!
     
  5. JenEric Farms

    JenEric Farms GOOGLE GENIUS

    Oct 31, 2007
    Maine
    My guess, if we're talking pure breeds:

    Brown eggs = Rhode Island Reds

    White eggs = Leghorns
     
  6. Davaroo

    Davaroo Poultry Crank

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    In numbers, its the Leghorn and its hybrids.

    In backyard flocks, its probably the RIR/sexlink.
     
  7. THunter

    THunter Songster

    As mentioned in another thread, no way I would rank BO's or RIR as high on the backyard layer list.
     
  8. JenEric Farms

    JenEric Farms GOOGLE GENIUS

    Oct 31, 2007
    Maine
    Quote:What would you say then... [​IMG]
     
  9. Gonzo

    Gonzo Songster

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    Doe's their eggs taste different?
    Quote:
     
  10. Judy

    Judy Crowing

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    Leghorns. BA's do well also. Sexlinks as well. Leghorns have been bred to be egg factories. They are flighty and pretty well useless for meat, though.

    EE's are very popular because of the green or blue eggs that you MIGHT get -- you might also get "pink," or beige -- but they start laying a lot later, as a group, than these others.
     

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