Egg removal after mite treatment?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by TXChickMama, Feb 5, 2017.

  1. TXChickMama

    TXChickMama Out Of The Brooder

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    Dec 29, 2015
    Hockley, TX
    Hi all,
    I have some hens with bare bottoms. No other feather loss, so I guess it's not molting and figured it must be some kind of mite or lice.
    [​IMG]

    I have inspected them and can't see any bugs or eggs. I can't see any in their coop either, but I decided to treat them for mites/lice anyway. I took all the sand out of their coop floor and all the bedding out of the nest boxes. I sprayed everything with Poultry Protector and put in new sand and bedding. I sprayed the hens down thoroughly with the Poultry Protector. I am giving them a container of peat moss and wood ash for dust baths. I was debating also using Garden and Poultry Dust with Permethrin on them and the sand, but am unsure since I haven't seen any real signs of mites/lice other than the unexplained feather loss.

    Question: There is no warning on either product about removing eggs after treatment. Do I need to throw away their eggs for two weeks after using the Poultry Protector? If I use the Garden and Poultry Dust with permethrin, will I need to throw away their eggs?

    Thanks for any advice or help. I'm surprised no information is on the label or their website about what to do about the eggs.
    This is the product I used:
    [​IMG]

    This is the product I'm debating whether to also use or not:
    [​IMG]
     
  2. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    That looks like feather picking to me. I don't know of any egg withdrawal with Permethrin. But I would not use lice or mite treatments anymore unless I could actually see any bugs or evidence of them. Feather picking can occur if they are over crowded or not being let outside to roam first thing in the morning. When they are confined, make sure they have at least 4 square feet per bird. Their feed should contain at least 16% protein, and 20% is even better. Eggs, tuna, and dry cat food in small amounts can bump up protein. Spray bare spots with BluKote a blue staining product that can hide them to help prevent pecking, and repeat every 3 days or so. Google "lice and mites in chickens" for several good articles with pictures on what to look for.
     
  3. TXChickMama

    TXChickMama Out Of The Brooder

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    Dec 29, 2015
    Hockley, TX
    I have 10 birds. They have a 16x16 outdoor enclosure, 8 feet tall with perches. They have a tunnel to come and go freely into or out of their coop. I have not seen any of them pecking at one another, but will try to keep a closer eye on them. I have some Blukote I can try. I also bought some feather fixer feed with more protein. They normally eat a layer pellet, but I'm not sure of the protein content. They have oyster shell to eat as desired for calcium. I have looked at several articles on mites and lice, but I just figured I was missing something and better be safe than sorry if I was going to have a major infestation.

    I do have 2 roosters in this group of 10. One was given to us as a youngster and we all thought it was a hen, but he turned out to be a roo. He is very timid (Ameraucana) and isn't successful with the ladies so far. Do you think a 2nd roo in the mix could be causing problems? The hens pretty much boss him around and the dominant roo ignores him so far. I know I need to get rid of him, but haven't had the heart to since I know he'll probably get eaten.
     
  4. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    Apr 3, 2011
    southern Ohio
    Layer feed is normally 16-17% protein. Some people feed lower protein scratch or grains that may be more like 8%. That type of feather picking is fairly common. I have one or two that look like that even though they are outside roaming all day, have their bottoms sprayed, and get layer feed--their feathers grow back after a molt, and get pecked out again later. Sometimes you just can't help it. It can become a bad habit it the flock, and the thing to worry about is that in severe cases it can lead to cannibalism. Flock raiser 20% plus your oyster shell for the extra calcium it does not have can be used for a while to bump up the protein. Here are a couple of good links with pictures and details of what to look for in lice and mites:
    http://anrcatalog.ucanr.edu/pdf/8162.pdf
    http://www.the-chicken-chick.com/2012/08/poultry-lice-and-mites-identification.html
     
  5. TXChickMama

    TXChickMama Out Of The Brooder

    35
    1
    41
    Dec 29, 2015
    Hockley, TX
    Thank you!
     

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