1. If this is your first time on BYC, we suggest you start with one of these three options:
    Raising Chickens Chicken Coops Join BYC
    If you're already a member of our community, click here to login & click here to learn what's new!

egglaying

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by Mother of All, Feb 8, 2012.

  1. Mother of All

    Mother of All Chillin' With My Peeps

    200
    0
    109
    May 3, 2010
    Millbrook
    I started a new flock late last summer about end of July they still are now laying. Can someone give my a reason why?
     
  2. StarLover21

    StarLover21 Chillin' With My Peeps

    2,199
    40
    173
    Oct 11, 2011
    Shhh....you'll jinx yourself

    However, its probably because they're first year pullets.
     
  3. jmtcmkb

    jmtcmkb Chillin' With My Peeps

    496
    36
    121
    Sep 2, 2011
    New Hampshire
    Are you saying they are NOT laying? I've got a friend who started a flock late July, she put lights on them and they started laying in December.
     
  4. Mother of All

    Mother of All Chillin' With My Peeps

    200
    0
    109
    May 3, 2010
    Millbrook
    they are not laying at all even my one banshee and my turkey in not laying and have on since Sept. I also have new other hens that started laying in Sept and layed for only a few weeks and then they stopped I have no eggs yet a feeding bill
     
  5. jmtcmkb

    jmtcmkb Chillin' With My Peeps

    496
    36
    121
    Sep 2, 2011
    New Hampshire
    I dont have much experience this is my first little flock> hoping someone may give you some insight. From what I have read they need the right feed (layer feed) and also enough daylight.

    What is the situation with feed and light?
     
  6. ADozenGirlz

    ADozenGirlz The Chicken Chick[IMG]emojione/assets/png/00ae.png

    6,115
    65
    281
    Oct 18, 2009
    Connecticut
    I started my original flock in July years ago too. Mine began laying in December but I was providing them with supplemental light. Hens need light to trigger the hormones necessary to make eggs, which is not available naturally in the wintertime. Here is some more info I wrote on the issue and what you can do to get them started!
    http://eggcartonlabels.blogspot.com/2011/09/supplemental-light-in-coop-why-how.html
     
  7. jmtcmkb

    jmtcmkb Chillin' With My Peeps

    496
    36
    121
    Sep 2, 2011
    New Hampshire
    Nice information thanks. Now I have a question for you and I am not the OP ;)

    Mine are about ready to start the laying process, they were hatchd end of Sept. I have a small coop 4x5. I do have christmas lights around the coop and run ( outside) but havent had them on since Christmas. Do you think if I start putting them on in the early am hours it would help with the light needs? I am up well before sunrise every day, crazy me!
     
  8. Fred's Hens

    Fred's Hens Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

    July chicks are at a slight disadvantage. They come into Point of Lay in December, right during the winter solstice period, the darkest days of the year. While some strains will lay anyhow, most will not. The keeper CAN supply supplemental lighting to fool them into laying, or one can just wait until spring, when the longer sunlight hours will stimulate them naturally.

    In contrast, a "spring chicken" or a chick hatched in March or April usually begins laying in September and normally don't struggle with this. This is where the old expression comes from, when talking about someone elderly, "She's not a spring chicken anymore." [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2012
  9. audrey02026

    audrey02026 Chillin' With My Peeps

    416
    4
    111
    Mar 25, 2011
    Dedham, Ma
    I have 4 that I hatched on 8/29 and two of them just started laying a couple weeks ago the other two haven't started yet. I ordered 4 from MPC end of June and they are all laying and have been for about a month now. I use no artificial light.
     
  10. ADozenGirlz

    ADozenGirlz The Chicken Chick[IMG]emojione/assets/png/00ae.png

    6,115
    65
    281
    Oct 18, 2009
    Connecticut
    The Christmas lights will absolutely help egg production. Aim for 12-14 hours of total light per day and turn them on in the morning (yawn. I'm SO not a morning person). You can put them on a timer if you prefer. Production will pickup within a week to 10 days!


     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by