Eggs stopped, why?

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by mendozer, Feb 15, 2018.

  1. mendozer

    mendozer Songster

    332
    11
    149
    Feb 27, 2011
    seattle
    I recently had them start up again after the winter (no light over the winter in the coop). But I moved their nesting box to a more convenient location in the coop for me to access. Now there hasn't been a single egg in 2 weeks. I know they don't like change, but come on! Those eggs have to come out sooner or later. Did they just go into egg hibernation to spite me?
     
  2. Yorkshire Coop

    Yorkshire Coop Moderator

    21,875
    19,205
    1,057
    Aug 16, 2014
    Yorkshire, UK
    My Coop
    I’m sure it’s not to spite you :lol: As with a new layer my thoughts are that they can take a bit of time to get their egg laying machines back in working order after the winter break. I’ve had the same happen here with one of my hens, she laid for a couple of weeks and now nothing for 10 days.
     
  3. Grub Digger

    Grub Digger Chirping

    206
    23
    86
    Jan 5, 2016
    Middle TN
    How old are your ladies? Do they free range at all? They might be hiding them. Is it possible that a predator might be harassing them? Even if they can't get in it can spook your girls. Do you have a rooster that might be over-mating them? Are they getting enough calcium? Are they getting enough water? New chickens added? Did they lose any friends? There are a lot of factors that can affect egg production...
     
  4. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler!

    62,041
    52,159
    1,417
    Nov 27, 2012
    SW Michigan
    My Coop
    If free ranging, lock em up:
    Free range birds sometimes need to be 'trained'(or re-trained) to lay in the coop nests, especially new layers. Leaving them locked in the coop for a week or so can help 'home' them to lay in the coop nests. Fake eggs/golf balls in the nests can help 'show' them were to lay. They can be confined to coop and maybe run 24/7 for a few days to a week, provided you have adequate space and ventilation, or confine them at least until mid to late afternoon. You help them create a new habit and they will usually stick with it. ..at least for a good while, then repeat as necessary.
     
    Grub Digger likes this.

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by: