Entire flock is getting sick

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by cjh0907, Dec 24, 2011.

  1. cjh0907

    cjh0907 Out Of The Brooder

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    Nov 5, 2011
    Western Mass
    A couple weeks ago one of my silkies started to sneeze. The sneezing is still going on however my flock of chickens is starting to sneeze and sounds like they are having trouble breathing. My silkies are seperated in another coop seperated from the rest so i dont know how it spread. I am low on funds and fresh out of college and cant afford to cull my entire flock and start over from scratch. it kills me because i have put so much time, effort, and money into starting this flock of 20 hens my beautiful rooster and flock of 6 silkies. Is there anything i can do to save my flock and how would i get them tested to see what it actually is?
     
  2. Fog the coop with oxine every evening (when they are roosting) for 7 evenings straight.

    Acquire a gallon of oxine (you do not need the activation crystals)
    mix 7 ozs of oxine in a gallon of water (more is not better, stick to this ratio)
    acquire humidifier like the old type used when you were sick as a child. I found a newer ultrasonic model, but the old types work also.
    Run about a 1/2 gallon of the solution through this and fog the coop with it. Set it on a chair or something and aim it towards the roosts About 5' away works well
    Add 1/2 oz of Oxine per gallon to their drinking water (forever)

    Pray

    Fix any draft problems moving air across chickens when they are roosting.

    Pray some more
     
  3. GreenMeadows

    GreenMeadows Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Dec 14, 2011
    Might hit them with an antiboitic for a week and if its bad then have one tested. I use Tylan 50 injected in the neck for 3 to 5 days but if its MG then you cant fix it. Hope its just a change in weather thats doing it.
    Quote:
     
  4. saladin

    saladin Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 30, 2009
    the South
    Another option:

    1. Run Sulmet in the water for 4 days.
    2. After this add 1 oz of Bleach to 1 gallon of drinking water (you can use the Oxine but Bleach is much cheaper; either will work fine). Do this the remainder of the winter.
    3. After giving the Sulmet wait about 5 days; if any of the birds is still sneezing give them a shot 1cc in the breast of Liquimycin for 3 days, reduce to 1/2 cc for 4 more days (or use the Tylan as suggested).

    This is basically the same advice you've already received. I only added two things: (1) starting with Sulmet and (2) using the Bleach or Oxine in the drinking water. (By the way, I use the Bleach. Have for between 5-10 years now; every single day.)
     
  5. chicknmania

    chicknmania Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    Jan 26, 2007
    central Ohio
    if you don't have a fogger you can mix the oxine with water and put it in a spray bottle. I believe the proportions are 1/4 cup to a gallon of water. You can also spray the birds with it and put a few drops of Oxine in a gallon of drinking water. Oxine is expensive but wickedly effective! You can buy a small bottle from www.firststatevetsupply. If you can't afford that, at least use bleach and disinfect everything under the sun.

    If you can't afford anything else, you can get Duramycin at the feed store and use it. It is not as effective as Tylan, but cheaper. If you can get Tylan at the feed store, definitely use it. Some stores don't sell it. For the Duramycin, use the proportions of 4 tsp per gallon of drinking water and dose the whole flock. You can also sprinkle the
    medicated water on their food if you use it lightly.

    If your birds are not dying, they may have CRD. Silkies are not very hardy so it is important to treat them quickly. If they are dying, inquire from your state, or your veterinarian, about getting a necropsy for a diagnosis. Bird illnesses are very hard to diagnose, apparently. If you do a necropsy it must be done within twenty four hours of the bird's death.

    Good luck.
     

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