Extra bird?

Discussion in 'Pictures & Stories of My Chickens' started by Jealous Gypsy, Jul 18, 2019.

  1. Jealous Gypsy

    Jealous Gypsy Songster

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    So I watched my baby guineas exploring outside when I realized a tiny sparrow joined them. It was hopping right along in line while I could hear momma and papa goin nuts about 10 feet away. I shooed it with a broom back to its rightful place... LOL!:lau Anyone have something like this happen?
     
  2. FeatheredFriends&Horses2

    FeatheredFriends&Horses2 Chirping

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    I've not had a baby bird try to join my chicken flock, but I have looked into my run to see a pair of pheasants and another time a flock of quail running around my coop!:rolleyes:
     
  3. drumstick diva

    drumstick diva Still crazy after all these years.

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    Out to pasture
    they are opportunists looking for a good free meal
     
    Willowspirit likes this.
  4. drumstick diva

    drumstick diva Still crazy after all these years.

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    Out to pasture
    However, they may introduce parasites or disease to your flock.
     
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  5. Jealous Gypsy

    Jealous Gypsy Songster

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    Wow that's amazing quail!
     
  6. Jealous Gypsy

    Jealous Gypsy Songster

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    Yea that was my first thought. This was a baby though and thankfully it just seemed to be following them not very much interaction and I'm really glad I caught it right away, but I'm keeping an eye on the keets to be sure.
     
  7. Joey6392

    Joey6392 In the Brooder

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    I have a peking and ruen duck.
    Every time they take a bath and shed feathers I see sparrows finches and other birds swooping down to pick up the stray feathers for nesting materials.
     
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  8. Fishkeeper

    Fishkeeper Crowing

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    Oh, yep, fledgeling baby tree-birds have more volume than sense. I've moved jay fledgies away from the road and had them demand food the entire time I was carrying them. Atricial birds (the ones that are naked and helpless as babies) only learn to be birds after they jump out of the nest and walk around on the ground for awhile, unlike precocial chicks (mobile at birth, think chickens) that start learning right at hatch, so they aren't terribly smart when they hit the ground for the first time.
    Probably the sparrow baby thought they were the same species!
    That's really cute! Take a picture if it happens again. A minute or two longer of contact won't hurt anything.
     
    Jealous Gypsy likes this.
  9. Jealous Gypsy

    Jealous Gypsy Songster

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    That's the weird part it wasnt bald just really tiny. It tried to fly and could but only about 4 feet at a time it seemed. It was quite determined to be a Guinea as it tried several times to rejoin them ... lol sorry lil dude. Yea I stuck with taking pictures especially since I live with just a tablet and no phone but it's ok maybe it will happen again.
     
  10. Fishkeeper

    Fishkeeper Crowing

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    Yep, that's a fledgeling. If you see a baby bird that's partially feathered, and can only fly a little bit, or not at all, but can run around, it's supposed to be on the ground. If you find one that's naked, or just covered in a very thin and non-feather-like down, that's a nestling that needs to go back in the nest.
    Birds will often temporarily join groups of other birds in foraging, since a group of other birds hanging out in one place can mean there's food in that place. Your little one might think the guinea chicks are on the ground because they found something to eat.
     
    Jealous Gypsy likes this.

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