Extra Roos Join Meaties at Freezer Camp

Discussion in 'Meat Birds ETC' started by bigredfeather, Nov 16, 2009.

  1. bigredfeather

    bigredfeather Chillin' With My Peeps

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    After our first attempt at butchering 62 meaties last weekend, we decided to clear out some extra roos from the coop this weekend. We did 5 Barnevelder (17 weeks old), 1 Dominique (20 weeks old), 1 Buff Orpington (28 weeks old), 1 Welsummer (32 weeks old), and 2 mutts(12 weeks old, they were little, but they were picking on my BCM's the same age). After doing the Cornishes last weekend that averaged over 5 pounds, these were much different. The Barnevelders were between 3-4 pounds and the Dominique was slightly bigger. The 28 week BO was very nice. I did some BO's at 20 weeks that weren't very meaty, but the additional 8 weeks did wonders. He was probaly the most attractive dressed carcus of them all. The Welsummer was the oldest, and the hardest to dress. Skin was thick and tough and the whole process took longer than the others. The additional feathers these birds have, makes plucking much more time consuming. I guess that is to be expected for older birds. For last weekends meatie venture, we had 7 people. We did it yesterday with just my wife, daughter, and myself. It was much different. It took a lot longer per bird, but it was nice working at a leasure pace, and having my 4 year old be able to really help. She was around last weekend, but found the kids that came with the help more interesting. We let her gut the 12 week olds. It worked out good because she could get her little hands inside the small chest cavity better than an adult. I think she really enjoyed it. The birds are resting in the fridge, and we're going to cook up a few of them this week. It will be interesting to compare the taste of these with the 8 week old meaties we did last week. I really liked the taste/texture of the Buffs we did a while back. I would guess we have over 170 pounds in the freezer now, so we should be good to go until next Spring, when we start 2010's meat production.

    I'm very glad we have discovered how easy it is to butcher ourselves. It is very rewarding.
     
  2. al6517

    al6517 Real Men can Cook

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    Good for you, way to go and getting the whole family involved makes it even more rewarding.

    AL
     
  3. kcravey

    kcravey Out Of The Brooder

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    Glad to hear the buffs were good! we have yet to eat ours but I just hatched a whole of bunch of them with plans to fill the freezer with the roos. What do you think is the best age to process the buffs? And a family event! Wow! Im impressed! Next monday is our DDAY for turkeys and quails and Ive been telling the kids they need to be there and help. I've read it is a really good experience for them to participate and really understand /see/touch/feel where their meat really comes from. Before it was always my DH and my son doing it and they always just skinned the birds. I want me and the girls to help this time to scald and pluck. Gotta leave the skin on the turkies for thanksgiving!
     
  4. kcravey

    kcravey Out Of The Brooder

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    I am also considering getting the cornishes in the spring... do you think they are better than the buffs?
     
  5. bigredfeather

    bigredfeather Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:For me, 20 weeks wasn't enough as far as size. I know that's what everyone recommends, but they weren't filled out. Twenty eight weeks produced nice leg quarters (which we like best), but the breast was small compared to a Cornish. I have figured out you can not compare "dual purpose breed" to the Cornish. It's like trying to compare an apple to an orange. I had hoped to have the BO's replace raising Cornishes, but I have come to the conclusion that I'm not patient enough to raise dual purpose breeds for meat production, or I don't have the right breed to do so.

    I hope your kids enjoy the expirience as much as mine did. I agree it's great to get kids invloved so they know where food come from.
     
  6. kcravey

    kcravey Out Of The Brooder

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    So the cornishes....compared to store bought meat... better? And which tastes better... cornishes or buffs?
     
  7. bigredfeather

    bigredfeather Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:Size/shape of dressed bird and short time to raise, I prefer the Cornish. Taste/texture of meat, I prefered the BO. That probably didn't help, but that's my take. I may just do some of both. Cornishes are great to raise for quick freezer fill up and for selling to others. The BO has great flavor and is necessay for cleaning up the roos from hatching. I guess I can eat my cake and have it too.
     
  8. bigredfeather

    bigredfeather Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:Homeraised Cornishes are much better than store bought as far as flavor/texture. I think BO's taste better than both. I didn't keep track of how much feed the BO's got, but I'm pretty sure the FCR would be miles higher than an 8 week old Cornish. So from an economic view, I'd think meat was much more expensive per pound.
     
  9. Buster52

    Buster52 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I assume you are talking about Cornish X, and not Cornish. My Cornish don't grow much faster than my BOs and RIRs.
     
  10. bigredfeather

    bigredfeather Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:Yes, Cornish X. I have a few Dark Cornishes, and I would agree, they don't grow quickly at all. They have great shape, and they are decivingly heavy for their size. I haven't culled and yet because I want to keep all I have for hatching more next year. I am anxious to see how they cook -up, as I have heard great things about meat texture and flavor. Maybe next year.
     

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