Fake eggs

Joe1962

Songster
Aug 3, 2018
97
119
101
I have first year Bantams and all Pullets are laying. I have one who seems to be liking one of the fake eggs I put in the boxes. She sets most of the day in the box on that fake egg. She is laying also but I take her eggs when she leaves the box. Been 2 days she has been doing this. Is she trying to be broody?
 

Joe1962

Songster
Aug 3, 2018
97
119
101
What is best for her?
I don't think it would be wise to let her hatch in the fall would it? I would gladly let her hatch in the spring.
What is best for her? Let her set on some eggs or keep taking them? I pulled all of the fakes except the one she is on. I will take it today when she comes out to feed.
 

Joe1962

Songster
Aug 3, 2018
97
119
101
Looks like another is going broody. She laid an egg this morning and has not left the box since.
 

rebrascora

Free Ranging
5 Years
Feb 14, 2014
7,127
8,648
556
Consett Co.Durham. UK
If you decide to let them brood. Make sure they are fully broody before you give them hatching eggs (usually sitting on an empty nest for 2 or 3 days and nights with only a 15 min break once a day, tells you they are committed to the task. You also need to have a plan to dispose of or deal with the minimum 50% cockerels that will result from any hatch. Keeping more than one adolescent male in a flock is stressful for the flock and probably you..... one is quite bad enough. You also have to consider if you have room for more chickens. Lack of space causes lots of behavioural problems that can be unhealthy, especially in winter when the weather often means they are confined to the coop during the day.
Since they are first time broodies, you probably should also consider having an incubator and brooder on standby in case they abandon their eggs or don't accept the chicks when they hatch.

If you do not want them to hatch any chicks right now, it is better to break them of their broodiness before they get too committed. At this early pre broody stage, removing the eggs regularly and lifting them out of the nest box and into the run and perhaps blocking access back to the nest box for a short while or placing them in a time out cage in the run, might be enough. A wire bottomed broody buster cage chocked up off the ground is the recognised technique for a seriously committed broody. Ensuring air flow underneath her to cool off her underside is what is required. Some people dunk them in cold water but I feel that is a bit drastic. It can take a few days and nights in the wire bottomed cage to break a stubborn one.

Good luck with them
 

bobbi-j

Crossing the Road
10 Years
Mar 15, 2010
14,360
27,075
982
On the MN prairie.
As long as they’re still laying, they’re not truly broody. I’d keep taking the eggs from them. Some chickens like to linger in the nest box. Once one truly goes broody you need to decide if you want to let her hatch, or break her. Living where I do, I would not let one hatch this late in the year.
 

Joe1962

Songster
Aug 3, 2018
97
119
101
If you decide to let them brood. Make sure they are fully broody before you give them hatching eggs (usually sitting on an empty nest for 2 or 3 days and nights with only a 15 min break once a day, tells you they are committed to the task. You also need to have a plan to dispose of or deal with the minimum 50% cockerels that will result from any hatch. Keeping more than one adolescent male in a flock is stressful for the flock and probably you..... one is quite bad enough. You also have to consider if you have room for more chickens. Lack of space causes lots of behavioural problems that can be unhealthy, especially in winter when the weather often means they are confined to the coop during the day.
Since they are first time broodies, you probably should also consider having an incubator and brooder on standby in case they abandon their eggs or don't accept the chicks when they hatch.

If you do not want them to hatch any chicks right now, it is better to break them of their broodiness before they get too committed. At this early pre broody stage, removing the eggs regularly and lifting them out of the nest box and into the run and perhaps blocking access back to the nest box for a short while or placing them in a time out cage in the run, might be enough. A wire bottomed broody buster cage chocked up off the ground is the recognised technique for a seriously committed broody. Ensuring air flow underneath her to cool off her underside is what is required. Some people dunk them in cold water but I feel that is a bit drastic. It can take a few days and nights in the wire bottomed cage to break a stubborn one.

Good luck with them
Thank you, So far I have let the first one go. The other seems to have given up after I took her eggs. I am setup with a good brooder and willing to welcome them into the house if needed. My birds are in a large coop. No screen bottom. Concrete with straw put down. There is lots of room for more birds. They also have a very large run enclosed in chicken wire 8' tall. I also let them out every day to free roam for at least 2.5 hours, all day on weekends.
 

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