FEED STORAGE

Discussion in 'Feeding & Watering Your Flock' started by JOSEPHC, Mar 6, 2013.

  1. JOSEPHC

    JOSEPHC Out Of The Brooder

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    I plan to store my 50 lb feed bag in a 31 gallon galvanized trash can with lid. The pail will be place inside my garage. I have dear, raccoons, occasional mice and very few (visible that is ) snakes in the area. My 8 chickens will consume about 55 lbs. per month.

    Is this a proper storage procedure? Should I use plastic as I read that galvanized sweats (condenses) and may contaminate the feed with mold? Should I use a 20 gallon pail or will that not be enough for 50 lbs.of feed?

    I am looking for your experience and practical advise.Thank you for your help.
     
  2. Michael Apple

    Michael Apple Overrun With Chickens

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    I've stored in galvanized cans with tight fitting lids for years and never had any problems. Just clean out that old spilled feed in the bottom before placing a new bag in there. Plastic is worthless. Rodents will eat right through it. I don't dump my feed out of the bag into the can. I place the whole bag in and open from the top. When you purchase your feed, don't accept any tears in the bag or a bag that has a filthy appearance. Keep it stored in cans, a cool, dry area like your garage or barn and it will be fine. I doubt 8 chickens will consume 50 lbs of feed in a month. Even so, most feed is sold in 50 lb, and very few in 25 lb. sacks. Even an organic feed will keep for more than a month when stored properly, but it's good to buy a month's worth at a time to keep the supply fresh.
     
  3. Egghead_Jr

    Egghead_Jr Overrun With Chickens

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    When I had 7 chickens they consumed about a bag per month. Not that I keep strict records but about a month or 5 weeks. It makes sense too, 1/4 pound of feed per bird each day is about 50 lbs in a month.

    I also keep my bag in a galvanized can. Mine is next to the run in some shade...I know, they say not to keep it in heat but it seems to keep just fine for a month. Storing in a garage is obviously better.
     
    Last edited: Mar 7, 2013
  4. JOSEPHC

    JOSEPHC Out Of The Brooder

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    Thank you for your advise. I plan to free-range them 2-3 days in the Spring and 4-5 in the Summer. What other thoughts does anyone have in terms of fee consumption for eight chickens?
     
  5. 4 the Birds

    4 the Birds Chillin' With My Peeps

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    For that number of birds, you will need at least 50lbs per month even if you free range. I like to feed pellets instead of the crumbles since there is less waste. Sell just a dozen each week to friends or family and your eggs will pay for your feed. We seem to always have 10 dozen eggs or so in our fridge and friends wanting to buy a carton full.

    As far as the container. Galvanized is OK but we just use large plastic trash cans to store our poultry and livestock grain (in the barn). It is very handy to fill with the bags, scoop into a bucket, and keep covered with a lid.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Mar 7, 2013
  6. JOSEPHC

    JOSEPHC Out Of The Brooder

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    Long Island New York
    Thank you! Are you saying that you empty the feed bag into the plastic can and then scoop out of the can? if so, what are the advantages/disadvantages?
     
  7. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive True BYC Addict

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    With a 50 lb. bag, you can use a 10 gallon can. I put 2 fifty lb. bags in a 20 gallon, and 3 bags in a 30 gallon. Just make sure the can never has sunlight on it, and it will only mold if you get feed that is old or has been stored in a hot vehicle for a long time. I love galvanized cans for feed. Put a couple of 2X4's under the can to keep it off dirt or litter to keep it from rusting.
     
  8. 4 the Birds

    4 the Birds Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Yup... just load er up and scoop out. I don't leave feed in the bag because mice can eat holes in feed bags. They don't bother plastic. Even if your bag is high and dry and away from mice, it is not easy to scoop from bags and they are hard to close up to keep insects out. . Also you can put a lid on a can or container. This keeps bugs/insects out and during the warm months.
     
  9. JOSEPHC

    JOSEPHC Out Of The Brooder

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    Dec 23, 2012
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    Super! Thanks.
     
  10. Egghead_Jr

    Egghead_Jr Overrun With Chickens

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    I dunno, we used a plastic trash can for two years with no problems then one day you find something chewed through it...and as Murphy's law dictates it will be the night after you filled it with feed...

    I suggest metal. I've done scoops but find it just as easy to pick up the bag out of the metal can and poor it into my feeder. Replace bag, replace metal lid and carry the container to where it's hung in the run. It works for me and I've a chew proof container now and a plastic container with a hole in it.
     

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