fence posts. 2x2 vs 4x4 vs landscape timbers

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by mah46036, Oct 19, 2010.

  1. mah46036

    mah46036 Out Of The Brooder

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    I'm looking to learn from your ideas, not my own mistakes. [​IMG]

    I am building a chicken moat and would like to use 4x4 treated for the posts just because I like the look better than steel posts but don't really have the money so I was wondering if 2x2 is strong enough? The biggest predator we have are coyotes and the occasional collisions from a child or two... We are also going to put an electric fence around the bottom as well.

    Thanks!
     
  2. Judy

    Judy Moderator Staff Member

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    Treated 2x2's? Are you planning on ripping them or something?

    We used treated 2x4's on the fence line with braced 4x4's at the corners only. I would not go smaller. Landscape timbers would be fine if they are more economical.
     
  3. Tala

    Tala Flock Mistress

    Definitely go 4x4s, no smaller.

    I also considered "landscape timbers" when building my fence, but treated 4x4's were a better deal. Either would work, depending on the prices in your area, but just letting you know that here 4x4's were the most economical route.
     
  4. mah46036

    mah46036 Out Of The Brooder

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    I only thought of 2x2 while searching craigslist for 4x4. I found a guy that has 100 2x2 for a buck each but I would have to pull them out of the ground. not really looking forward to that effort. lol
     
  5. Matt A NC

    Matt A NC Overrun With Chickens

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    The problem with 2x2s is that they can warp. Treated are not as bad, but with a good amount of humidity they are going to bend.

    Matt
     
  6. Judy

    Judy Moderator Staff Member

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    Any untreated wood in the ground will be sawdust in a year.
     
  7. EMAW

    EMAW Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I use treated 4x4s as my first choice when building fencing. Landscaping timbers are usually a more economical second choice, most fencing companies/builders seem to use them unless you upgrade to 4x4s for the 6' wood fences. Skip the 2x2s, they just won't hold up, IMHO.

    My 2 cents, whatever you decide to use as a post, let it set out for a couple weeks and dry out. I have bought what looked like perfectly straight treated 4x4s and landscape timbers only to end up with twisted and warped boards a week or two later once they dried in the sun. I always order about 25% (Lowes/Home Depot) more than I need when starting a project, and use the lumber that did not deform. I have always been able to return the unused/unusable lumber.

    No matter what you decide to use, Good Luck with the chicken moat.
     
  8. Ahab

    Ahab Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:Cedar won't. Locust won't. The remnants of fence posts sunk a century ago still run down my property line. Thirty-eight years ago, when we moved here, most of them were still semi-intact, and clinging to drooping strands of rusting barbed wire.

    At least in the Maine climate, untreated cedar posts will last a good 30 years.
     
  9. Judy

    Judy Moderator Staff Member

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    Quote:Cedar won't. Locust won't. The remnants of fence posts sunk a century ago still run down my property line. Thirty-eight years ago, when we moved here, most of them were still semi-intact, and clinging to drooping strands of rusting barbed wire.

    At least in the Maine climate, untreated cedar posts will last a good 30 years.

    You're right, I misspoke. Wouldn't it be something if someone had such wood on Craigslist?

    I think there are some other woods like this, too -- redwood and cypress come to mind, maybe?

    I was thinking of the usual woods at HD and Lowes like pine and fir, of course.
     
  10. MomtoSyd&Emma

    MomtoSyd&Emma Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jul 13, 2009
    Southern VA
    we used 4x4s and timbers. Timbers WILL rot alot sooner than the 4x4s will (trust me we know lol)

    So if you can afford to spend the $3 more per post, use the 4x4s. We ran out of money and wanted it done so we used the timbers for some posts, and will have to replace those soon I am sure!
     

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