filthy broilers

Discussion in 'Meat Birds ETC' started by rhoda_bruce, Dec 30, 2010.

  1. rhoda_bruce

    rhoda_bruce Chillin' With My Peeps

    980
    5
    131
    Aug 19, 2009
    Cut Off, LA
    Since getting back into chickens about a year and half ago, I incubated my own eggs 3 times and sold the pullets and raised the roos for meat in my kids playhouse. Afterwards, we would clean out the house for the girls to play again, etc.
    Well I bought chickens from school for the broiler contest, for my niece to take to the 4H contest. I did what I always did to protect the floor.......large cardboard boxes, with pine needles or oak leaves. Waterers up on bricks to keep it clean and lots of food.
    These broilers seem to be eating, pooping machines. They have the playhouse filthy in no time.
    They are very nice meat birds and I have tended to some, but as hard as I have tried to change out their litter, they mess it up. Today I slaughtered one and it was so dirty that instead of killing #2, I took every one of them out and completely cleaned everything and then replaced the litter, then all the feeding equipment, then I finished off by washing the remainding chickens in warm, soapy water and throwing the cleaned birds in the pine needles.
    I feel I need a special coop just to brood my chicks until they are slaughtering age, with lots of room and special feeders that those big monsters can actually fit their heads into and make a really long waterer out of 6 inch pvc pipe and a toilet float, so they never run out of anything.
    I am hoping that would be the solution to the mess. If I show up in a coop with a rake and start moving things around, they will stay away from me and maybe I can keep things clean. Otherwise, I'm not much better than the commercial breeders.
    Anyone with a practical suggestion for me to keep these broilers clean until freezer camp? As I can see it, the problem is worse with cornish X than RIRs or araucanas.
     
  2. stanglover2001

    stanglover2001 Chillin' With My Peeps

    1,630
    12
    161
    Apr 29, 2010
    [​IMG]

    I keep mine in a movable pvc tractor... I live in TN and still havn't had any losses to predators [​IMG] knock on wood...
     
  3. rhoda_bruce

    rhoda_bruce Chillin' With My Peeps

    980
    5
    131
    Aug 19, 2009
    Cut Off, LA
    I have a few tractors, but they all being used for araucana color projects and guineas. But mine are all heavy and made of wood. I have toyed with the idea of a pvc tractor. Bet it would be really lightweight, but I have worried about the coons and dogs. In my head, I know about how I would want it fixed, but I am afraid I mess up on the math and cut the pipe wrong.
    But what about electricity? I'd have to drag an extention cord around for warmth/light, until old enough to do without. They would be cleaner though. And speaking on this subject.....why on Earth is our local broiler project done during winter anyway? Seems like if we would get them in March, instead of October, we could raise them without as much worry about the cold.
     
  4. stanglover2001

    stanglover2001 Chillin' With My Peeps

    1,630
    12
    161
    Apr 29, 2010
    Yeah, I'm acctually having that trouble with the cold... the pvc tractor really doesn't do it for the cold months except for older dual purpose breeds that won't freeze. I have my meaties in a wooden tractor with no coop attachment (exactly like the pvc but I did 2 x 2's) I was able to hang a heat lamp in that one but it's really hard to move by myself... I have a bruise on my leg to prove it [​IMG] and I drag an extension cord around... hundred foot one... I'm never raising them past October ever again, they're not growing out like my last batch. They are cleaner though! I have no trouble to move them in the warmer months to new grass with the pvc tractor... my only advice is when you're planning on building one go to your local plumbers shop and look at all the different elbows and attachments because they don't make some that I thought they did [​IMG]
     
  5. rhoda_bruce

    rhoda_bruce Chillin' With My Peeps

    980
    5
    131
    Aug 19, 2009
    Cut Off, LA
    I would think if I did something like that, I would want it pretty big....like maybe 20 X 20. Not sure if that would comprimise the moveability though.
     
  6. stanglover2001

    stanglover2001 Chillin' With My Peeps

    1,630
    12
    161
    Apr 29, 2010
    Why 20 x 20? If you don't mind me asking... I can do 20-25 in the one I have... Not sure of its measurements right now though I think it's like 6-8' x 8-10'. I do think it'd be doable if you make sure all the horizontal pieces aren't extremely long, you'd have to do alot of supports. You'd also have to make a triangle up on the top for water drainage... Which is why I have mine channeling down in one spot, I can't tell you how many times though even with that I've had to run out in the pouring rain to lift the whole tractor up to drain the excess pool of water about to break my tractor in 2. Tarps aren't cheap and they don't really last long [​IMG]
     
  7. rhoda_bruce

    rhoda_bruce Chillin' With My Peeps

    980
    5
    131
    Aug 19, 2009
    Cut Off, LA
    If the size is a problem, for sturdiness, I could want it smaller, but maybe 2 of them. I am in the process of killing the 25 broilers now. I would have wanted more like 50 chicks to raise, if space wouldn't have been a problem. My family is too big for me to go a year on just 25.
    I am toying with the idea of just making another big coop I can use 2 or 3 times a year which I can double as a greenhouse. I mean, I can see that for whatever reason I used to not kill roos on time, I have quite gotten over it.
     
  8. KatyTheChickenLady

    KatyTheChickenLady Bird of A Different Feather

    5,146
    10
    251
    Dec 20, 2008
    Boise, Idaho
    this one worked just great for 25
    [​IMG]
     
  9. rhoda_bruce

    rhoda_bruce Chillin' With My Peeps

    980
    5
    131
    Aug 19, 2009
    Cut Off, LA
    Katy...are you also of the opinion that raising broilers in the winter is not the ideal way to go?
    Considering the mess I am being presented with and 2 members showing me a pvc pic, I can honestly say that just moving them would have been the easier route, but as of now, I am still helping my birds with lights for warmth. I must confess, I am tempted. My husband does have a big box of pipe connections downstairs and a lot of pipe. I might just study it a while.
     
  10. KatyTheChickenLady

    KatyTheChickenLady Bird of A Different Feather

    5,146
    10
    251
    Dec 20, 2008
    Boise, Idaho
    I think since they are such a "hot" bird that one would loose fewer in the winter, but I would not want to deal with the mess, no-way! Early spring I throw mine out without heat even. I loose a couple to piling, but then so does everyone else. The heat of summer was the worse. To me they are a spring and fall crop of birds.
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by