First Experiment Making/Using Biochar

Red-Stars-in-RI

Crowing
7 Years
Mar 24, 2014
1,321
3,088
316
Rhode Island
I recently had my first foray into making and using biochar. Anyone else using it in your coop, run, or compost setups?

Blog post with pictures

For me, the most surprising thing was how much adding a small amount of biochar to the coop bedding really helped eliminate odors...for a solid 2-3 weeks. Something I'm going to work into the system more as I have good backyard fire days.
 

cavemanrich

Addict
7 Years
Apr 6, 2014
18,188
64,816
1,317
Melrose Park Illinois
I do have some good size camp fires in our backyard as well. After the fires die down, there are some charred pieces left over, and not totally burned. Wonder if those would be considered biochar. I can screen those out with a setup I have using hardware cloth as screen. (it is on a wooden frame).
I can also make a container from some tanks, that would be quite well sealed, but not totally. Gasses and moisture would be able to escape, but limited air to enter into inside. That tank would last quite a longer time-span than paint cans. (thin metal) You did make some holes in bottom of your cans.
Here is my typical campfire. They do burn well into dark. Yes,,,,, we do roast wieners:drool:drool:drooland marshmallows :drool:drool:drool when flames subside, and coals glow red
IMG_20200907_190344888.jpg


WISHING YOU BEST,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,and :highfive:
 

Red-Stars-in-RI

Crowing
7 Years
Mar 24, 2014
1,321
3,088
316
Rhode Island
Ha ha...that looks more of a good old “brush pile burning” than a backyard campfire! :D

I’d imagine a fire that size would leave behind some biochar.

My next move will be use a metal trash can, which should hold a lot more volume and last longer as it’s thicker metal.

A few well placed holes are key. That lets the gases escape, which avoids pressure buildup and also helps fuel the process.
 

irish44395

Songster
Aug 11, 2020
91
168
116
Gulfport, FL.
I do have some good size camp fires in our backyard as well. After the fires die down, there are some charred pieces left over, and not totally burned. Wonder if those would be considered biochar. I can screen those out with a setup I have using hardware cloth as screen. (it is on a wooden frame).
I can also make a container from some tanks, that would be quite well sealed, but not totally. Gasses and moisture would be able to escape, but limited air to enter into inside. That tank would last quite a longer time-span than paint cans. (thin metal) You did make some holes in bottom of your cans.
Here is my typical campfire. They do burn well into dark. Yes,,,,, we do roast wieners:drool:drool:drooland marshmallows :drool:drool:drool when flames subside, and coals glow red View attachment 2467046

WISHING YOU BEST,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,and :highfive:
Yes that is bio chard I use it in the garden and compost pile I just sprinkle the ash in the run and dust bath
 

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