Foot Issues - Not Typical Bumblefoot? *Photos Added*

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by rodriguezpoultry, Aug 9, 2009.

  1. redhen

    redhen Kiss My Grits...

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    [​IMG] I have no clue! (of course)

    But i know someone will chime in to help you! Good luck!
     
  2. speckledhen

    speckledhen Intentional Solitude

    That is very strange. My first thought was gout, but I don't know. It's not regular bumblefoot, IMO.
     
  3. rodriguezpoultry

    rodriguezpoultry Langshan Lover

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    I'm sending the photos to my professor as well...hopefully he can help at least enlighten me.

    Antibiotics do no good whatsoever. I can't feel her bones in her foot anymore, so either it's surrounded by that "stuff" or it's scar tissue surrounding the bones or the bones are actually gone.

    I thought of gout also, but the diet she's on is the same diet they've been on for the past 15 years? The protein is only 16%?
     
  4. Judy

    Judy Crowing

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    Quote:Cellulitis is an inflammation without infection -- until it gets infected from being inflamed, of course.

    This isn't the first post I've read recently about cottage cheese-y stuff. The cottage cheese to me sounds like a fungus or (more likely) yeast, rather than bacteria; usually, bumblefoot is staph, a bacteria. If this guess is right, and that is a long shot, I don't know how you would treat it without a vet to give you a systemic med. Although you can buy antifungals and antiyeast ointments and creams over the counter, for feet, and for vaginal yeast infections.

    If the antibiotic ointment did not help, and if it were me, and if vet care was not an option, I would probably try a med for yeast infections.

    This is a people nurse talking, and I have absolutely no way of knowing if this would work: disclaimer statement!
     
  5. ivan3

    ivan3 spurredon

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    Gout is not always related to diet alone but, rather, genetics and diet and age (how old is this hen?). The fact that it is generalized, the drainage is primarily whitish and `cheesy' looking certainly is suggestive of gout.

    If you have access to a microscope (x400) it should be a pretty simple matter to rule it out (monosodium urate crystals).

    I'd be soaking her feet in betadine (open wounds) and epsom salts (good for gout). Make sure to completely dissolve the epsom salts in a little very hot water before adding warm water and squirting in betadine (otherwise you'll end up with a potent, clumpy aliquot of crud in the bottom of the container).

    Organic ACV in her water and maybe vitamin C would be helpful as well.

    If it is gout then the soaks might be the most helpful (maybe there's a `gout diet' for chooks?).
     
  6. rodriguezpoultry

    rodriguezpoultry Langshan Lover

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    She's only 9 months old. Her "sister" and "brother" are completely normal??
     
  7. ivan3

    ivan3 spurredon

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    Only 9 months, that is unusual. I assumed, as you said hen and feeding the same thing for 15yr. and, remembering your posts about your 12yr. old roo AKA Quasimodo, and as the feet of the pullet look to belong to a much older bird, that she was a bit `longer in the beak' (still sticking to the hypothesis given the info, but am looking to learn something here). I'd treat as above (can't hurt). That it is bilateral would suggest something systemic. That the other two seem fine, and if they've not been in separate areas from one another (toxin/etc.) would make me more suspicious of a possible genetic contribution.

    Please post your prof's info. If you can get some more of the white exudate get a scope on it.

    Hoping for the best (gout is nasty maybe something less damaging)!
     
    Last edited: Aug 16, 2009
  8. rodriguezpoultry

    rodriguezpoultry Langshan Lover

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    Here are photos of her with her "sister" and the male and then the 2 year old hen beside him for comparison. She is the one closest to the camera. She has not laid an egg yet, but her "sister" (the one in the very back) has:

    [​IMG]

    Mr. Mom...he was a rare bird indeed. I was hoping to get him up past 14, but that dog attack hit him harder than I thought. [​IMG] Luckily, this bird had no wounds of any type on her. I checked everywhere. I have birds ranging from several different ages. From 1 day old to 9 years old in Mr. Mom's offspring.
     
  9. rodriguezpoultry

    rodriguezpoultry Langshan Lover

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    Here was the reply I got from my professor:

    A couple of things to consider.


    The Oxy 200 can interfere with healing since the foot has a very limited circulation.

    There could be some Articular gout present,if so it does also impede healing.

    Bumbelfoot can be extremely difficult to treat if the tendons and sheaths are affected. I would try washing the foot with Betadine then using Lugols Iodine on the wound.

    You can also use peroxide to flush the wound with but it can also delay healing somewhat in avians.​
     
  10. Sonoran Silkies

    Sonoran Silkies Flock Mistress

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    If there is a concern about a fungal infection, soaking in listerine could help. Oral antifungals intended for humans can be helpful as well, however nystatin is pretty useless for just about any creature--read the literature--helps a little bit only half the time. Most other antifungals are more effective.
     

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