Fowl pox?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by clemston, Aug 21, 2011.

  1. clemston

    clemston Out Of The Brooder

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    From other pictures I've seen, I'm assuming this is fowl pox... can anyone confirm? (I live in South FL, if that matters). If so... So far 2 of my 6 adults have it (the gal in the photo has it worst) and I've noticed my 3 5-month-old chicks haven't been developing very quickly lately. Should I try to vaccinate at this point or just let it run through?

    [​IMG]
     
  2. kuntrygirl

    kuntrygirl Reduce, Reuse, Recycle

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  3. lilchick

    lilchick Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Yes that looks like the dry form of fowl pox. If you have birds that are not showing signs you could vaccinate them. Once you mix the vial of vaccine it needs used up quickly so I purchase more than one and keep it in frig unmixed, for lack of better word till I have a need for it.

    Some people just let it run it's course, especially if in the dry form..

    I raise several types of fowl and have more than one barn. So if I have an outbreak in one barn I vaccinate the others.. good luck.

    I found the cheapest place to order the vaccine is from JeffersLivestock.com
     
  4. presley

    presley Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have been dealing with this for weeks now. Have already lost 3 birds, and feel sure will lose 2 more by days end. I had 26 chickens, and my first mistake was getting them from more than one source. (first time chicken person!) I am so sick of this, wish it would just stop! I have talked to a vet that told me there is really nothing to be done, the vaccine must be given when still chicks, like by 12 weeks. Dry pox will usually go away on it own, but some of mine is turning into wet pox, which kills them. The scabs get into their insides and slowly kills them. The last batch of chickens I got was 5 French Cooper Marans, not for showing just for eggs, one rooster and the rest hens, and 2 hens are gone, the rooster will go today am sure. I have wormed them, put antibiotics in water, fed them with droppers, put electrolytes in water, we gutted their coop and cleaned real well, just don't kno what else to do. Some of my chickens, the RI reds, the Barred Rocks, buff Orpingtons, show no signs of getting it whatsoever, don't know if they were vaccinated at birth or what. But the vet said at this point there is no need to separate the sick ones because they have all been exposed. He said just let it run its course and keep doing what we're doing.
     
  5. clemston

    clemston Out Of The Brooder

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    Apr 11, 2011
    Naples, FL
    Thank you all for the info! I think I may just let it run its course since mosquitos are SO abundant here and I suspect they've all been exposed already.

    Presley-- I'm so sorry you're dealing with such a difficult situation... sounds heartbreaking! [​IMG]
     
  6. kuntrygirl

    kuntrygirl Reduce, Reuse, Recycle

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    Quote:Please keep an eye on secondary infections. Check their mouths for lesions. Hopefully, it won't turn in to that.
     
  7. welasharon

    welasharon Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I was fortunate that mine just had the dry and it went away on its own. I hope they all got some exposure as we are in North Florida with bad mosquitos as well.
    sharon
     
  8. presley

    presley Chillin' With My Peeps

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    A couple of mine did have a touch of the dry pox that did not go any farther,thank goodness. But it seems the Marans are getting it full force. We are in southern Alabama so mosquitos are bad here also. My rooster is just barely hanging on, I know should put him down, but really don't know how to go about it? He will be gone by tonight, but right now just suffering.
     
  9. kuntrygirl

    kuntrygirl Reduce, Reuse, Recycle

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    Quote:I'm so sorry to hear about your rooster. I know it's tough, just the thought of putting your rooster down. Is there anyone that can do this for you, so your poor guy does not have to suffer anymore?
     
  10. Sonoran Silkies

    Sonoran Silkies Flock Mistress

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    For birds where it turns to wet pox, you can swab their mouths and throats with either blu-kote or original listerine. Personally I have used the listerine. You need to swab at least twice daily, and remove as much of the diptherial lesion as possible. It will be painful to the bird, especially initially, but you should be able to remove a bit more each time you swab, and the pain will lessen. The reason you need to remove this is that it will eventually block both trachea and esophagus. The bird will stop eating and drinking and not be able to breathe. By keeping these passages open the bird has a better chance to live. Many sources recommend putting the bird on an antibiotic. Note that it will not affect the fowl pox as it is a virus, but it will help prevent secondary infections which can be common.

    Another recommendation is to put either iodine and/or neosporin on external pox lesions. Personally I have mixed the two togeher, along with campho-phenique for external lesions. Note that you need antiviral products to treat fowl pox; with the exception of neosporin and antibiotivc for secondary infections, the products I've mentioned all have anti-viral properties.
     

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