Gapeworms

Discussion in 'Peafowl' started by casportpony, Mar 5, 2015.

  1. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member

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    Quote:
    Quote:
     
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  2. KsKingBee

    KsKingBee Overrun With Chickens

    Thanks for sharing that. Would you know how fast gapes will kill a bird?
     
  3. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member

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    Of course I'd like to know. Please tell me you didn't lose one.

    -Kathy
     
  4. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member

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    Sorry, I mis-read that! I have no idea how fast they can kill.

    -Kathy
     
  5. KsKingBee

    KsKingBee Overrun With Chickens

    No, I haven't lost any birds. I am still trying to figure out what the problem was with that yearling hen that I sent you the video of last fall that was yawning constantly. Anyway, it was still doing it a couple of weeks ago and with the severe cold it was looking a bit worse. She has good weight and lots of meat on her breast, I brought her in and gave her a heat lamp and started her on Corid and Safeguard for five days. We also brought her in a friendly little chicken to keep her company in the parrot cage.

    She looks to be right as rain, no yawning or coughing at all. I might add that she had no other symptoms when I brought her in. Brad told me to cull her last fall, but I didn't do it. Last year I gave her the whole gambit of anti-biotics, Corid, and Safeguard and she got moderately better after about six weeks of being in the infirmary. Now the weather is getting nice she will be going back into gen pop.
     
  6. frenchblackcopper

    frenchblackcopper Chillin' With My Peeps

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    From the first sign of seeing the bird "Gape" about 4 days is all you have. I lost a bronze hen two years go to gape,first noticed her on Sat eve and we had plans we couldn't get out for the next day so Monday called Craig Hopkins,he said to drench her with safeguard twice a day,,naturally my local farm store doesn't carry safegard for goats,,so the next morning I made to 35 mile trip to get a bottle and when I got home she had passed. i later learned that Ivermectrin will immediatedly shrink the size of the worm so the bird can start breathing better,sooner.
     
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  7. KsKingBee

    KsKingBee Overrun With Chickens

    That is good to know, thanks. What was the recommended dosage of Ivermec for gapes?

    ETA, I guess she didn't have gapes if four days is all that she would have to live if she did have them.
     
    Last edited: Mar 5, 2015
  8. frenchblackcopper

    frenchblackcopper Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I think it was 5cc per dose,twice a day but that was 2 years ago and I havn't had it again. Next time I will use Ivermectrin instead since it shrinks the worm size while killing it.
     
  9. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member

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    I treated gapes with Safeguard once and the dose I used was 50mg/kg once a day for five days, but gapes were cleared in two or three days. If I ever have to treat them again I think I might try it twice a day, and might even try ivermectin with Safeguard.

    -Kathy
     
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  10. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member

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    This study suggests fenbendazole (Safeguard) for three days at 20mg/kg.
    Quote:
    Abstract

    Fenbendazole 4% (Panacur, Hoechst) administered in feed was used to treat chickens infected with Ascaridia galli, Heterakis gallinarum and Railletina spp. It was also used to treat Syngamus trachea in broiler birds. There was a marked drop in helminth egg counts in the faeces on the second day of treatment and the faeces became negative by the seventh day after the last treatment. Post-mortem examination 15 to 21 days later showed that the drug was 100% effective against Ascaridia galli and Heterakis gallinarum at 10 mg/kg. However, for complete removal of Railletina spp. 15 mg/kg was required. Similarly 20 mg/kg fenbendazole was effective against Syngamus trachea. It was concluded that fenbendazole is suitable for the treatment of the important intestinal and tracheal worms of poultry, a dose of 15 to 20 mg/kg for 3 consecutive days being recommended for use under field conditions.
    -Kathy
     

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