German line new hampshires ???

Discussion in 'What Breed Or Gender is This?' started by gregory991, Jan 28, 2017.

  1. gregory991

    gregory991 Out Of The Brooder

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    Our flock of new hampshires is more darker can they be a german line because i have read they are more darker than americans?

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  2. drumstick diva

    drumstick diva Still crazy after all these years. Premium Member

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    Duplicate post
     
  3. Lady of McCamley

    Lady of McCamley Overrun With Chickens

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    other post has no photos, so I'll answer here.

    Sorry, but they look more like production reds than New Hampshires.

    Wrong coloring, no black ticking at neck, not properly ticked at tails.

    Here is a breeder quality German New Hampshire from a local breeder I know.

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  4. BantamLover21

    BantamLover21 Overrun With Chickens

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    Agreed.
     
  5. gregory991

    gregory991 Out Of The Brooder

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    oh sorry i forgot to put a photo in first post, i have buoght them as chicks from a local hatchery they said they say they are new hampshire reds but even production red is not bad.
     
  6. Lady of McCamley

    Lady of McCamley Overrun With Chickens

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    When a hatchery says New Hampshire Red, it will be a hybrid usually of Rhode Island Red and commercial New Hampshire. There is no New Hampshire Red breed, that is a hybrid.

    That is simply another name for production red.

    It is hard to get a true New Hampshire from hatcheries as they have infused and mixed their lines for production.

    The German line of New Hampshire in America is attempt by some breeders to purify the breed again, but you'll only get that from breeders.

    Nothing wrong with a hatchery production red or NHR if your goal is eggs and hardy birds. They lay very large eggs regularly and tend to be pleasant birds. They usually are big enough for dual purpose as well.

    Enjoy your flock
    LofMc
     
  7. gregory991

    gregory991 Out Of The Brooder

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    Thankyou, very much for the informations, i have a rooster that differs from the others that are darker can it be a NHR, beacuse im more interested in new hampshires.

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  8. junebuggena

    junebuggena Chicken Obsessed

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    His body shape is wrong for New Hampshire, but he is pretty close in terms of coloring. If developing a line of New Hampshires is something you are serious about, he would be a good start.
     
  9. gregory991

    gregory991 Out Of The Brooder

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    Just tell me how to do that and i will do it with pleasure. Ex. With what to mix etc...
     
    Last edited: Jan 29, 2017
  10. junebuggena

    junebuggena Chicken Obsessed

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    Just take the hens that are closest to breed standard, and the rooster that is closest to breed standard, and breed them. This will involve a lot of time, setting and hatching a LOT of chicks, and space for grow outs. Keep the chicks till they are at least 8 weeks old, then make your first round of culls (rehome or grow out for slaughter, your choice). Birds with obvious faults, like too dark of coloring, or improperly marked will be the most obvious to remove from your potential breeding gene pool. Make another round of culls at 6 months of age, for conformation, this time, taking into account the overall build of the birds. With careful selection and a few generations, you can develop a line of birds that very near breed standard. The New Hampshire breed is in pretty poor condition and could use more dedicated people working on them.
     

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