1. If this is your first time on BYC, we suggest you start with one of these three options:
    Raising Chickens Chicken Coops Join BYC
    If you're already a member of our community, click here to login & click here to learn what's new!

Getting ducks used to people?

Discussion in 'Ducks' started by lesduckerables, Oct 27, 2014.

  1. lesduckerables

    lesduckerables New Egg

    7
    0
    9
    Oct 24, 2014
    Oregon
    I have two 9 month old Welsh Harlequins, a drake and a hen. Neither of them had really been involved with humans much before I got them, except being put in the cage I got them in. I want to be able to hand-feed them regularly, hold them, pet them, etc. But they're terrified of me. I've held them to move them a few times, but they seem terrified. (They do a cute little butt shake when they're scared!!) My drake has eaten out of my hand a few times, so has my hen, but my drake is a lot more willing to than my hen. Also! How often do they need to mate before eggs are fertile. My hen has yet to lay any eggs in her past few days with me, but they've. Erm. "Done it" a few times. Both times they were able to swim in some water they did. Should I watch them to make sure my hen doesn't drown? When should she start laying again?
    Thanks :)
     
  2. Amiga

    Amiga Overrun with Runners Premium Member

    22,956
    1,918
    471
    Jan 3, 2010
    Southern New England
    Love your screen name!

    Ducks take some patience. Generally, spending time near them, talking quietly, singing, reading to them, and offering treats near you helps quite a bit. And part of it depends on the individual duck.

    Drakes can be tricky - some have one duck (female) and they are a happy couple for life. Some drakes can get aggressive. So watching them is important. The eggs should be fertile soon after they start mating.

    If you feel anything is not right - like he's being rough or not letting her come up for air after 20 to 30 seconds or so (that is just a guess of mine - and yes, I have timed them), you may want to separate them by a divider fence so they can see each other when you are not around to supervise.
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by