Ginger Red And Opal Colors?

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by Boggy Bottom Bantams, Aug 22, 2010.

  1. Henk69

    Henk69 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Nov 29, 2008
    Groesbeek Netherlands
    In that case it would be proved that opal is not allelic to recessive white. I would be interested in the source of this finding.
    Still, dominant white alleles are mostly dominant, so opal doesn't fit.
     
  2. nicalandia

    nicalandia Overrun With Chickens

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    Henk I believe Sjarvis provided enough evidence for our earlier assessment, other sources need to be as meticulous. I believe he is confusing the smokey gene(dominant white allele) with Opal
     
  3. sjarvis00

    sjarvis00 Chillin' With My Peeps

    May 4, 2009
    Shawnee, OKlahoma
    Tim,
    I will have to disagree with that statement, I made a cross with known recessive white hens using an Opal Male, all offspring demonstrated some color but not full color. None of the F1-F3 generations out of that mating were ever Black.
    I did make a test mating with Red Pyle a short time ago, to modify some other type issues this resulted in a yellowish down color with grey dusting as was seen in the early Opal chicks. These are known to be a cross of E and e+

    Here are a few Pics. Pure Opal first,
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    The Red Pyle Cross,
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    Last edited: Sep 25, 2012
  4. sjarvis00

    sjarvis00 Chillin' With My Peeps

    May 4, 2009
    Shawnee, OKlahoma
    The chicks that start off with the dark bluish to near black down and white breast develop thier color a bit differently and quicker, they do not start off smoky grey and turn the dun color they start the dun the color when setting in the color Here is one from last winters matings that was a Blue chick.
    [​IMG]
     
  5. nicalandia

    nicalandia Overrun With Chickens

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    thanks again Sjarvis for your input, now the yellowish down can be due to dominant white and the grey dusting could be due to the heterozygous form of dominant white...
     
    Last edited: Sep 25, 2012
  6. nicalandia

    nicalandia Overrun With Chickens

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    is this bird based on Extended black or whats the e allele he is based on
     
  7. sjarvis00

    sjarvis00 Chillin' With My Peeps

    May 4, 2009
    Shawnee, OKlahoma
    He is extended black. no cross there, and is the father to the red pyle cross chick.
     
  8. sjarvis00

    sjarvis00 Chillin' With My Peeps

    May 4, 2009
    Shawnee, OKlahoma
    My thoughts exactly Marvin. Knowing what was in the breeding pen helps when you make a cross and being able to document the birds breeding back 10 + generations helps. I made the cross to help with a problem with wing length and scissor wing problems but did not expect to get the traditional "opal" colored chcik from a known cross of E and e+, I have one other mating that is a bit less known as to the genetic make-up as the female involved in that mating was crossed with a Birchen base one generation back, those chicks are grey with lighter undertones. But once again is a cross at the e-locus for extended black and possibly birchen.
     
  9. nicalandia

    nicalandia Overrun With Chickens

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    I love and appreciate your breeding documentation, this will help alot of people in the future, one question have how does Opal look on a e+/e+ background,
     
  10. sjarvis00

    sjarvis00 Chillin' With My Peeps

    May 4, 2009
    Shawnee, OKlahoma
    Quote:
    I have no Idea, I may find out if I run a F1xF1 like normal, I am interested to see if it will develop a wing bay myself.

    Here is some additional photos to document the cross with Rec. white. The first is the Opal male that was used, second was the resulting F1 male, then F2 Male, F3 Male, and F4 male. Only line breeding was used with the cross to close it from other influences.
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